You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Friday, April 30, 2010

Follow Friday - 30 Apr 2010

 
Follow Friday - 30 Apr 2010

My recommendations this week. As usual, these are not in any particular order, I normally pick a good post from my week's readings, or left from the prior week! Hope they are useful or at least interesting to you, as well! If it is your first visit, even better!  ;-)

POST:

This post has a very long title: Go Green, Write About Your Farmer Ancestors with the Blogger's Almanac at the Family Curator: Preserving and Sharing our Family Treasures. I like the title, I love the farmer/rancher reading Progressive Farmer on/near his porch... and the post is interesting as well!


BLOG:


As you know, I really like to promote collecting, sharing and telling ancestor stories. Today's example, One Pilot's War, is an excellent example. Thanks, Brian!

More of us could do this, if we just would. This came to my attention through the New GeneaBloggers - Thanks again, Thomas!


INTERNET RESOURCE:

This week I am reminding myself to feature excellent specialty blogs that are excellent resources for those of us doing that particular type of research. There is usually something for everyone, as well, if we but check regularly.

To day we feature: Steve's Genealogy Blog, named one of the 40 Best Genealogy Blogs by Family Tree Magazine. Steve's recent series on: "A Beginner's Guide to Eastern Europe Genealogy..." in three parts, so far, was especially of interest.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Proofreading reminder

Thanks to our friends at; eNews from the New England Historic Genealogical Society, toward the end of a good article on proofreading manuscripts:

"One thing you must prepare yourself for is that no matter how many people proofread your document, the minute you publish something you will find an error that wasn’t caught. Rare is the book or magazine that doesn’t have some type of error in it. You will also discover that many people jump to give you feedback about errors. Some will present it to you in a friendly tone to assist you. Others will come across as self-important know-it-alls who criticize others to inflate their own self-worth. Kindly thank the former, and ignore the latter. Include the important step of proofreading in your writing, and your final product will always be the best it can be."

To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/publications/eNews.asp.

Families are Forever!  ;-) 

Treasure Chest Thursday - 1950 Chevrolet and house

Treasure Chest Thursday - 1950 Chevrolet and house

A week or so ago, I mentioned the 1950 Chevy that we took on our first big trip as a family. Here is a photo of that car in front of our farm house. Dad obviously took the photo... of Tommie, Mom, Jimmie and Billie... we became Tom, Jim and Bill in a couple of years! Again, before we added the Family Room.



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Angel Food Cake undated

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Angel Food Cake undated

I've mentioned before that I always got an angel food cake with white frosting for my birthday. Here is an undated (late 1940s or early 1950s?) photo of Mom with one of them. White picket gate to the garden, behind, past the Wash House, brings back many memories, as well. The house was on the left - before the family room was added!


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday - Elizabeth Stinson

Tombstone Tuesday - Elizabeth Stinson

This tombstone image was shared by a cousin many years ago. I just came across it searching for something else. I immediately was reminded of how unusual it seemed... with the full maiden name, yet clearly showing Elizabeth STINSON was the wife of William F. KINNICK.

Elizabeth died 2 July 1856, aged 35 years, 3 months, 4 days - born 28 Mar 1820 in North Carolina, per my records.

Her husband, William Franklin KINNICK was born in 1822 in North Carolina and lived until 1895. They had three children, all born in Clark Twp, Johnson Co, IN: Benjamin, Mary Elizabeth, and Emma (per our records). Emma was born Jun 1856, so it appears Elizabeth died less than a month after Emma was born. Sad.

The 1880 census had the father, William, 57, with son, Benjamin, 29, and daughter, Emma, 24.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, April 26, 2010

My Hometown on Monday - Crouqet Court

My Hometown on Monday - Croquet Court - Week 17

From the Coon Rapids Centennial 100 years proud 1863-1963:





Looks like fun!



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, April 25, 2010

Sunday Special - You are an Ancestor Too!

Sunday Special - You are an Ancestor Too!

I really enjoy reading about others who see great value in telling ancestor stories, and why they say they do it. I use a Google Blog Alert to send me any Internet stories using the term "ancestor stories." Today, I was sent a nice interview that included the following quote at the end of the interview. It says a lot that I believe. I would welcome your comments!


Interview by Katharine on April 22, 2010, at "A Storied Career":

"Yes, it would be wonderful to know our ancestors’ stories. But what we often forget is that we, too, are someone’s ancestor. We are the future historians’ primary sources. A primary source is a term historians use to describe the thoughts, opinions and witness of those people who were really there. When you record what you saw, what you felt, what you did, you become a primary source. Two hundred years from now, historians could be looking for you. What do you want them to find? Just your tombstone with the dates of your birth and death, and perhaps a line of verse? Does that tell your dreams, desires, triumphs, griefs, loves and hates? Does it tell what part you played in the story of the world?
Sharing your stories is an affirmation of belonging. You have a rightful place here. Without you, the history of the world is incomplete."
Quote from Kim Pearson, who writes the blog, "From the Compost" {Kim Pearson's blog about writing, history, and storytelling, with some haiku thrown in.}


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Surname Saturday - HEALEY

Surname Saturday - HEALEY

Through the first 26 weeks of Surname Saturday posts, we named and discussed the surnames of my "round of thirty-two" (scroll down a bit) - back through 3rd great grandparents.

Now we are in the second week of sharing some of the "further back" surnames with which I have spent some time and done some research - some, like today, again, quite a bit, actually.

Today, we will look briefly at HEALEY, a common name in early Massachusetts. This is going back on my father's mother's line, PRESTON. Her father was James and her grandfather was William, The Old Sheriff. The father of William, the old sheriff was also William PRESTON (1755-1842) (and his wife, Elizabeth Cynthia LORD). His mother was Hannah HEALEY (1734-1812) who married William PRETON (1728-1804). This William was born in Beverly, MA, and died in Strafford, Orange Co, VT. Hannah HEALEY was born in Chester, NH, and died in Strafford, Orange Co, VT.

Hannah was the youngest daughter of William (1689/90-1771/2) HEALY and Mary (1690-?) SANBORN (we will look at SANBORN next Saturday!)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, April 23, 2010

Follow Friday - 23 Apr 2010

Follow Friday - 23 Apr 2010

My recommendations this week. As usual, these are not in any particular order, I normally pick a good post from my week's readings, or left from the prior week! Hope they are useful or at least interesting to you, as well! If it is your first visit, even better!  ;-)

POST:

I want to credi Betty's Boneyard Genealogy Blog post on 4/9/10 for the following resource:

Bureau of Land Management General Land Office Records Search Site

If you are looking for US land patents or records in the 1800s, then you might want to check out the BLM GLO website.  Using their search engine,  I was able to find and view scanned copies of the original land patents for several ancestors in Missouri in the 1840s.

According to the BLM GLO website:

"We ... provide image access to more than three million Federal land title records for Eastern Public Land States, issued between 1820 and 1908. Currently, we are adding images of Military Land Warrants. These land patents were issued to individuals as a reward for their military service. Images related to survey plats and field notes, dating back to 1810, are added to the site state-by-state as each state's documents are completed. Due to organization of documents in the GLO collection, this site does not currently contain every Federal title record issued for the Public Land States."


BLOG:

Tangled Trees is described as: "Making History Your Own - A Genealogist's thoughts, tidbits, inspirations, and, of course, brick wall - All very much randomly posed. One person's life does not stand-alone but interacts with family, neighbors, community, and history. Our Trees become Tangled just by living. -- T."

You get exactly what was described. I like that!  ;-)


INTERNET RESOURCE:

I have this site, Kick-Ass Genealogy, on my iGoogle Genealogy Page so that I can check it regularly, and don't miss a post. Today I just read the April 20, 2010, post: How to Find and Use Historical Sources in Your Genealogy (Part I). I started to put it in my POST recommendation, above, and realized I really treat the Kick-Ass Genealogy site as a Resource rather than just a blog... hence, this recommendation. It is always a good read, and, Katrina has her posts well organized by topic, so you can always to find the information for which you are looking.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Treasure Chest Thursday - Plaster of Paris Car

Treasure Chest Thursday - Plaster of Paris Car

Some time back I shared with you a photo of my old Plaster of Paris rubber car molds. I recently came across an old black and white photo of a "fort" I had built on the carpet, while playing with, among other things, one of the Ford Plaster of Paris cars - it is the white one on the left. Note the wheels. I apparently had not painted this one yet...!! The living room carpet from our farm house is also very familiar. Have you noticed how the stuff in the background becomes more important, as the years go by!


Actually, that almost looks like the molds laying there, as well. Also note the domino... playing some part!?!  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 1950 Family Trip 12110ft

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 1950 Family Trip 12110ft

I was lucky that my family took vacation trips around the country. This one to Colorado in 1950, in the new 1950 Chevy started it off. Younger brothers Jim and Tom - I was taking this photo!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday - George F. H. Wilson

Tombstone Tuesday - George F. H. Wilson



This photo was taken over in Henry County, IL, in 1995. George F. H. Wilson is my wife's 2nd great grandfather. This little cemetery is out in the "middle of nowhere" - but it has a great view of the countryside. His son, Norman, called his farm in Iowa, "Far View" - the named applied well to this little cemetery in Illinois, as well. I just like the photo!  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, April 19, 2010

My Hometown on Monday - 1909 Basketball

My Hometown on Monday - 1909 Basketball - Week 16

From the Coon Rapids Centennial 100 years proud 1863-1963:




Did you recognize one of the Pingrey Sisters?


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, April 18, 2010

Sentimental Sunday - Wedding note in paper

Sentimental Sunday - Wedding note in paper


Last Sunday, as I posted my first Sentimental Sunday post, I received via email the following newspaper clipping, from a friend, with this note: "I found this article this morning and I thought it might be of interest to you. You may already have this, but I wouldn't feel right if I had seen it and not sent it your way!" Thank you, Lori Hellmund, this is a real benefit of an ancestry blog. I had the info, but did not have the actual newspaper clipping. How neat! THANKS, again, Lori!





Joseph and Mary went on to have 5 children over the next 15 years.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, April 17, 2010

Surname Saturday - BRIGHTWELL

Surname Saturday - BRIGHTWELL

Through the last 26 weeks, we have named and discussed the surnames of my "round of thirty-two" (scroll down a bit) - back through 3rd great grandparents.

Next, I want to share some of the "further back" surnames with which I have spent some time and done some research - some, like today, quite a bit, actually.

I will start with my mother's paternal line, KINNICK. The 4th GG is believed to be ISAACS, but we are not even close to proving it. The 5th GG is believed to be FERGUSON, but again, not proven satisfactorily. This is the Sgt Major William KINNICK level. His mother, the wife of Jasper KINNICK, was Elizabeth BRIGHTWELL. Elizabeth was the daughter of Captain Richard BRIGHTWELL, of the Horse Rangers, of early Maryland (from his arrival from England in 1666 as an indentured servant of Major Thomas Truman, to his death in 1696 as a prosperous land owner).

I published an article: "Richard Brightwell Family in Maryland, 1640s to 1740s," in the Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, Vol. 44, No. 2, Spring 2003, pp. 218-238.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, April 16, 2010

Follow Friday - 16 Apr 2010

Follow Friday - 16 Apr 2010

My recommendations this week. As usual, these are not in any particular order, I normally pick a good post from my week's readings, or left from the prior week! Hope they are useful or at least interesting to you, as well! If it is your first visit, even better!  ;-)

POST:

This blog post, and the comments, on Genealogy's Star, has interesting things to think about. See what you think


BLOG:

This week my recommendation is to check out Nutfield Genealogy - regularly something new and interesting.


INTERNET RESOURCE:
eNews from the New England Historical Genealogical Society at NewEnglandAncestors.org is a useful, free resource. Check it out.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 15, 2010

Treasure Chest Thursday - Cradle Roll Certificate

Treasure Chest Thursday - Cradle Roll Certificate

Not to be outdone by my Mom, in saving old things, here is my Cradle Roll Certificate from the Star Methodist Sunday School, when I had just passed two months old. Oh! You say my Mom must have saved it so that I would have it now... You are probably right, now that I think about it. Thanks! I note that the Sunday School Superintendent, Rhoda Wilson, was an aunt of my wife - we've know each other since those days in the Sunday School in the fall of 1939!


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 1934 - Mom with car

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 1934 - Mom with car

Here is a "not too good" photo of my Mom, between Sophomore and Junior Year in high School, in front of their neat "old car" - nice to see her, but, the car is the star, right!  ;-)



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday - Bill and Grandfather Smith


Tombstone Tuesday - Bill and Grandfather W. E. Smith


Here I am, a few years ago, at the Coon Rapids, Iowa, Cemetery, with the Tombstone of my Grandfather, William Emanuel Smith, born 5 May 1869, died 8 Oct 1939; 70 year, 5 mos, 3 days. He died just a little over 3 months after I was born. I am now 70 year, 9 months and 9 days. We are coming up on 141 years since he was born. No big deal, just interesting...  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, April 12, 2010

My Hometown on Monday - Altruism

My Hometown on Monday - Altruism - Week 15


From the Coon Rapids Centennial 100 years proud 1863-1963:


You may recall we had another ice wagon photo from this era - Williams the Ice Man.

Here, also, was an excellent photo of Lem Williams.

Families are Forever!

Sunday, April 11, 2010

Sentimental Sunday - High School Quartet

Sentimental Sunday - High School Quartet


I think anything over 50 years old probably qualifies as "Sentimental" - certainly singing in a high school quartet with your future spouse of more than 50 years qualifies... Nancy and I in fall of 1956 or spring of 1957 - with good friends, Andy Kretizinger, great tenor, and Mary King, our soprano. Great times! Looks like the photo was in a school paper of some kind. This quartet went to All-State, that year, so it is likely in the fall... Nancy and I went together to All-State all four years of high school; Andy went all four years, in different quartets. Certainly fond memories...  ;-)

Families are forever!  ;-)

Saturday, April 10, 2010

Surname Saturday - KIRK

Surname Saturday - KIRK

On previous Saturdays, we have reported all of the known ancestor lineage surnames through  the great-great grandparent surnames (see earlier Saturday Surname posts in the left column, scroll down - back into 2009) and we have started on the next batch.

Today we finish the "round of thirty-two" (scroll down a bit...) - 3rd great-grandparents - We know and will have reported on 9 of the sixteen Male lines (four are from Denmark) we know and will be reporting on nine new female surname lines of the possible sixteen: VESTERSTROM, SPRANG, LORD, KIMMERLING, FIRESTONE, SCHWYHART, LEE, JONES, and KIRK.

Today, we will look briefly at KIRK.

Williams was my mother's paternal grandmother's surname. Nettie WILLIAM's father, Elias WILLIAMS and her mother was Ann Eliza DUNCAN. Ann was the daughter of Braxton DUNCAN (1798-1859) and  Araminta KIRK (1813-1855). Araminta was born in Scotland, and died in Duncan Prairie, Mercer Co, Illinois.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, April 9, 2010

Follow Friday - 9 Apr 2010

Follow Friday - 9 Apr 2010

My recommendations this week. As usual, these are not in any particular order, I normally pick a good post from my week's readings, or left from the prior week! Hope they are useful or at least interesting to you, as well! If it is your first visit, even better!  ;-)

POST:

This week, Leland shared an interesting perspective on Federal Census Day. Thanks!


BLOG:

This week, Creative Gene, host of the Carnival of Genealogy, 92nd Edition. Thank you!


INTERNET RESOURCE:

genealogyinsider {by Diane Haddad & The Family Tree Magazine Staff} is an interesting "in=between" blog, with updates and referrals. I think you will find it useful and interesting.



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Treasure Chest Thursday - Mom's Piano Teacher

Treasure Chest Thursday - Mom's Piano Teacher

Last week, I mentioned my Mom teaching piano lessons for so many years, and her first teacher, her Aunt, Frances WILLIAMS (later KECK). Here is a Christmas gift she received from Frances - Mom said they normally didn't get much in the way of Christmas gifts, in her family, back then - an autographed calendar from her teacher (looks like a neat promotional device, to me, but Mom saw it as something VERY special, and personal, at the time... and through the many years she obviously kept it... and passed it on!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 1936 Photoalbum - Flock

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 1936 Photo album - Flock

Another page from Mom's 1936 photo album - farm scenes: the chickens; Leo was her older brother, Buzz her younger brother.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Tombstone Tuesday - John W. RECTOR

Tombstone Tuesday - John W. RECTOR

 Last week, we shared the stone of Franklin Pierce RECTOR, who was a brother of John W., sons of Jacob and Frances (LITTLE) RECTOR. Today we will focus on John W. RECTOR, born 13 May 1842, in Indiana, and died 17 Apr 1863, at age 23 years, 11 mon, 5 days. He is said to have died of fever, suffering during his Civil War service. He is buried in the Forest Hill - Hunter Cemetery in Lyon County, Kansas (near Emporia) along with others in his family including his brother, Franklin.





 


 Thanks to the Flint Hills Genealogy Society and Emporia D.A.R. here is the list of those in this small Forest Hill-Hunter Cemetery.

Of the family, by given name, and year of burial:

Carrie C. - 1911 (wife of Franklin)
Carrie Pearl - 1888 (2 year old)
Chesle - 1901 (3 year old)
Frances - 1868 (Jacob's second wife)
Frank P. - 1924 (Son of Jacob and Frances)
George F.  - 1894 (infant)
Jacob - 1880 (Father)
Jacob A. - 1925 (Son of Jacob and Frances)
John - 1872 (Brother of Jacob)
John W. - 1863 (Son of Jacob and Frances)
Lafayette - 1892 (Son of Jacob and first wife)
Sydney E. - 1895 (five year old)

Jacob RECTOR was the son of Peter RECTOR, Jr. (1773, VA-1827, NC) and Mary KINNICK (1878, MD- 1873, IN)

Family is Forever!  ;-)

Monday, April 5, 2010

My Hometown on Monday - The Pingrey Family in census

My Hometown on Monday - The Pingrey Family in census - week 14

Last week, week 13, along with the photo of the six sisters, I included this census report of the family.

In the 1910 U.S. Census, the W. H. (Wilson H.) Pingrey family is listed - actually in Orange Township, Guthrie County, Iowa, near Coon Rapids:

W.H. Pingrey, 44, Aug 1855, parents born in Vermont, married Lucretia in 1879
Lucretia Pingrey, 37
Grace O. Pingrey, 19 (Grace)
Jessie B. Pingrey, 18 (Jessie)
Mary G. Pingrey, 16 (Gertrude)
Frederick W. Pingrey, 15
Franklin A. Pingrey, 12
Jennie  M. Pingrey, 10 (Maud)
Ada L. Pingrey, 7 (Adah)
Bertha L. Pingrey, 5 (Bertha)
plus two others.

This week, week 14, I want to share some additional selected census information for this family in 1920 and 1930. Let's start with the information from the photo caption:

Grace, Mrs. Chas. Carpenter
Jessie, Mrs C. E. Wolfe
Gertrude, Mrs. Albert Carpenter
Maud, Mrs. Chas. Cretsinger
Adah, Mrs. W. E. Macklin
Bertha, Mrs. Chas. W. Thomas


1920 census

Name: Grace O Carpenter Home in 1920: Union, Carroll, Iowa Age: 34 years 
Household Members:

Grace O Carpenter, 34, Farmer, wd

Virginia C Carpenter, 12
Bethane L Carpenter, 9
Dale P Carpenter, 8
Stanton C Carpenter, 6


1920 Census

Household Members:
Albert G Carpenter, 39
Mary G Carpenter, 35
Hudson A Carpenter, 11
Russell W Carpenter, 9
Maurice R Carpenter, 7
Mary A Carpenter, 5 1/12
Clara L Carpenter, 3 8/12
Maude L Carpenter, 3 8/12
Edward C Carpenter, 1


1920 Census

Name: Wilson H Pingrey Home in 1920: Coon Rapids, Carroll, Iowa
Household Members:

Wilson H Pingrey, 64
Lucretia Pingrey, 57
Fred W Pingrey, 35
Pearl Bower, 34
Bertha Kennedy, 31
Sarah Love, 25
Comments:
Wilson, Financier
Fred, Salesman Realty, son
Pearl, F, Merchant, Dry Goods Store, Roomer
Bertha, F, Bookkeeper, Bank, Roomer
Sarah Love, F, Teacher, Public School, Roomer


1920 census

William E. Macklin, 28, born in China, parents in Canada and Michigan, Veterinary
Ada L. ", 26,
Jean L., 3, daughter
William E., 2, son
John D. Son, 3/12


1930 census

Name: C E Wolfe Home in 1930: Union, Carroll, Iowa
Household Members:

C E Wolfe, 51
Jessie L Wolfe, 48
Wilson Wolfe. 18
Thomas P Wolfe, 11
Frances Matthews, 39

CE Wolfe - Med Doctor, General Prac
Frances, F, Boarder, Teacher, Public School


1930 census,

Name: Charles M. Cretsinger Home in 1930: Orange, Guthrie, Iowa
Household Members:

Charles M Cretsinger, 41
Maud J Cretsinger, 40
Leora Cretsinger, 11
Linette Cretsinger, 10
Frances Cretsinger, 1 1/12


1930 census

Name: Charles W. Thomas Home in 1930: Union, Carroll, Iowa
Household Members:

Charles W Thomas, 36
Bertha L Thomas, 35
Helen M Thomas, 17
Bette L Thomas, 10
Marion F Thomas, 9
Majorie A Thomas, 7
Russell O Smith, 21


1930 census
Name: Frank Pingrey Home in 1930: Union, Carroll, Iowa
Household Members:

Frank Pingrey, 41
Mabel Pingrey, 32
Dorothy Pingrey, 18
Margaret Pingrey, 16
Wilson Pingrey, 15
Kenneth Pingrey, 11


1930 census

Name: Fred W Pingrey Home in 1930: Union, Carroll, Iowa
Household Members:

Fred W Pingrey, 45
Joe Fesck, 75 - Laborer


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, April 4, 2010

Civil War Series on Sunday - Albert Sydney Johnston

In my Thursday Ancestor Approved Award posting I mentioned Confederate General Albert Sydney Johnston in the Civil War. This is, in brief, his story.
He was born in Washington, Kentucky, the youngest son of Dr. John and Abigail Harris Johnston

Johnston was first educated at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, where he met fellow student Jefferson Davis. Both were appointed to the United States Military Academy, Davis two years behind Johnston. Johnston served as an officer in Black Hawk War in 1832. However, he resigned his commission in 1834 to return to Kentucky to care for his dying wife. They had one son, Col. William Preston Johnston, who would also serve in the Confederate Army. After farming for a time, in Texas, Johnston enlisted as a private in the Texas Army during the Texas War of Independence. Later he was promoted through the ranks and in 1837, be became senior brigadier general in command of the Texas Army. He lost that position after a duel, but was appointed Secretary of War by the second president of the Republic of Texas. In Feb 1840, he resigned and returned to Kentucky, where he remarried. They settled on a large plantation he named China Grove in Brazoria County, Texas.

He returned to the Texas Army during the Mexican-American War under General Zachary Taylor as a colonel of the 1st Texas Rifle Volunteers. He returned to his plantation after the war until appointed by President Taylor to the U.S. Army. He became a key figure in the Utah War, leading the U.S. troops who established a non-Mormon government in the formerly Mormon territory. He received brevet promotion to brigadier general in 1857 for his service in Utah. He spent 1860 in Kentucky (see census data, below) until December 21, when he sailed for California to take command of the Department of the Pacific.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was approached to take his Union forces east. However, when he heard of the secession of Texas, he resigned his commission on 9 April 1861. He managed to work his way east, reaching Richmond, Virginia, about the first of September, 1861. There Johnston was appointed a full general by his friend, Jefferson Davis. On May 30, 1861, Johnston became the second highest ranking Confederate general as commander of the Western Department.

Johnston used his concentrated forces to launch a surprise attack against Grant at the Battle of Shiloh on 5 Apr 1862 that resulted in a back and forth across the battlefield with some of the highest casualties for both sides of any battle of the war.  Just after mid-day, as he was personally leading and rallying his troops, Johnston took a bullet behind his right knee. Not thinking it serious, he sent his personal physician off to serve other wounded. The bullet had clipped his popliteal artery and his boot was filling up with blood. It may be that the injury in his earlier duel prevented him from realizing the numbness in his leg. When asked again, if he was injured, he is said to have replied, "Yes, and I fear seriously." Taken to a small ravine, he bled to death in minutes. (*)

*The above information is based mostly on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Sidney_Johnston, paraphrased and edited for this presentation.

Johnston was my fourth cousin, twice removed. Albert's mother was Abigail Harris. Her father was Edward Harris. His mother was Abigail Presbury, daughter of Edward Presbury, whose parents were William Prebury and Priscilla Randall the common ancestors. Edward's brother was William Presson who married Mary Raymond. Their son William Preston married Hannah Healey. Their son was William Preston who married Elizabeth Cynthia Lord; they were the parent of William Preston, the Old Sheriff of Williams County, my second great-grandfather. Researching this set of lines, with the many name changes has been a challenge for our family, over a number of years. None of these are the major Preston lines in New England (we had to work around them!) ...  ;-)


1860 U. S. Census on Ancestry.com:
Name: A S Jonston
[Albert S Johnston] 

Age in 1860: 57
Birth Year: abt 1803
Birthplace: Kentucky
Home in 1860: Louisville Ward 7, Jefferson, Kentucky
Gender: Male
Post Office: Louisville

Household Members:
Name, Age
A S Jonston, 57
Eliza Jonston, 38
A S Jonston, 15
Hancock Jonston, 12
Margrett Jonston, 8
Griffin Jonston, 3
Briggett Barey, 28, servant, born in Ireland


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Degrees of Separation

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Degrees of Separation

Thanks to Genea-Musing for another fun excerice, borrowed and adapted from another this week! Stop by there, to see the adaptation, of course.

On one side, I've got one more step than Randy, because two of them died too young...

1. I knew Paul Kinnick, my grandfather
2. Paul knew Walter Watson Kinnick, his grandfather and a Civil War veteran.
3. Walter Watson knew his father, Walter Kinnick.
4. Walter knew John Kinnick, his father
5. John knew his father, William, Sgt Major in Maryland line in Rev War. The Maryland troops were in Wilmington, Delaware, during the time Washington was at Valley Forge - they did capture a British ship, while there, with lots of supplies and took many prisoners... little known history, unless you are a Maryland buff...


However, now that I think of it:
My third great-grandfather, John Butler was at Valley Forge, with his seven first cousins, five of them officers, at least one would have been interacting directly with General Washington.

1. My dad knew his mom, Ella Preston
2. She knew her dad, James P. Preston
3. James knew his grandfather, John Butler
4. John knew his first cousin, General Richard Butler
5. Richard knew General Washington. Washington appointed him Commissioner of Indian Affairs in the west (Ohio Valley) right after the war.

Four degrees of Separation from General George Washington - guess that's why I have about 15 bios of Washington on my shelf, an arms length away. Had not thought of this, before, Randy. THANKS!  ;-)

Families are Forever!

Surname Saturday - JONES

http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/2010/02/surname-saturday-vesterstrom.html
Surname Saturday - JONES

On previous Saturdays, we have reported all of the known ancestor lineage surnames through  the great-great grandparent surnames (see earlier Saturday Surname posts in the left column, scroll down - back into 2009) and we have started on the next batch.


Looking ahead, from the "round of thirty-two" (scroll down a bit...) - 3rd great-grandparents - We know and will have reported on 9 of the sixteen Male lines (four are from Denmark) we know and will be reporting on nine new female surname lines of the possible sixteen: VESTERSTROM, SPRANG, LORD, KIMMERLING, FIRESTONE, SCHWYHART, LEE, JONES, and KIRK.



Today, we will look briefly at JONES. It relates to WILLIAMS. WILLIAMS was my mother's paternal grandmother's surname. Nettie WILLIAM's father, Elias WILLIAMS, was born in either Gyffylliog, Denhigh, England or Ruthin, Wales (I do not have confirmation either way, yet) on 29 Jan 1838. The parents of Elias were William WILLIMS and Margart JONES. She is said to have been born in Ruthin, Wales. They had one daughter, of which I am aware, Mary A. WILLIAMS, b. Dec 1836, in Wales. She married a Richard H. JONES, and they had two children, each born in Minnesota.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, April 2, 2010

Funeral Card Friday - Glenn Bolger

Funeral Card Friday - Glenn H. Bolger

Here is a card for father-in-laws funeral - he left us far too soon - nearly 30 years ago, already. My dad was a Casketbearer. They were good friends all their lives. Thanks to Dee Welborn for suggesting Funeral Card Friday.



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Follow Friday - 2 Apr 2010

Follow Friday - 2 Apr 2010

My recommendations this week. As usual, these are not in any particular order, I normally pick a good post from my week's readings, or left from the prior week! Hope they are useful or at least interesting to you, as well! If it is your first visit, even better!  ;-)

POST:

I doesn't matter to me that this one is nearly a year old... I love photos of folks at work. This is the Weller Hardware, through the years. Very neat!! Thanks, Dave!  We got to this one from the neat photo of Dave's grandfather on Wordless Wednesday...  ;-)


BLOG:

Finding Josephine has been a joy to follow, especially the journey with Tempy Burton. If you haven't read the story, please take the time to follow it...

INTERNET RESOURCE:

Ancestry Magazine website has a wide variety of  useful articles and archives that may be of interest. Check it out.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Ancestor Approved Award

I was pleased and surprised to have Dionne Ford pass along this award to me, today: Treasure Chest Thursday: My first Genealogy Blogging award at Finding Josephine. I add my thanks to Leslie Ann at Ancestors Live Here for initiating the award.




The recipient of this award is supposed to list ten things we have learned about any of our ancestors that has surprised, humbled, or enlightened us and pass along the award to ten other bloggers who we feel are doing their ancestors proud. Here we go...

Surprised
    •    My great-grandfather, James P. Preston, actually had a long life, despite my aunt saying, "we don't know much about him!"
    •    Albert Sydney Johnston, highest ranking General of the Confederate Army to die in the Civil War, at Shiloh, was my 4th cousin, twice removed.
    •    My second great-grandfather, William Preston, was the first elected Sheriff of Williams County, Ohio, at that time in Defiance, OH. We was known as the first white settler of Defiance, and, as "The Old Sheriff!"
    •    My fifth great-grandfather, William Kinnick, was Sergeant-Major during most of his three years of Revolutionary War service, and participated in most of the northern campaign battles.


Humbled by
    •    learning that Roger Conant, co-founder of Salem, MA, and Governor of the Massechusetts Bay Colony was my ninth great grandfather.
    •    finding that I have so many ancestors who were in either the Civil War or the Revolutionary War


Thrilled
    •    to realize my first "born in Ireland" ancestor, third great-grandfather, John Butler was also one of eight first cousins who were with George Washington at Valley Forge; five officers and three enlisted men.
    •    to find that my fifth great-grandfather, William Kinnick, and his brother, Jasper, fought in the War of Jenkin's Ear, in 1741-42.
    •    to find that my seventh great-grandfather, Captain Richard Brightwell, was a contemporary of George Washington's grandfather, and they participated together on Indian affairs across the Potomac at least once that is recorded; Washington from Virginia and Brightwell from Maryland, in Maryland.
    •    being a fourth cousin, twice removed, of Nile Kinnick, Heisman Trophy Winner out of the University of Iowa.


Passing this award along to:


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Treasure Chest Thursday - Mom's First Piano Book

My Mom has been gone more than ten years now, but her boxes of "stuff" continue to bring pleasure. Her greatest self-identity was probably playing the piano. She taught piano lessons to at least three generations in Coon Rapids, Iowa, her hometown. This is photo of HER first piano lesson book, that she still had, from the 1920s. She took lessons from her aunt, Frances WILLIAMS (later KECK).


Families are Forever!  ;-)