You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Friday, May 25, 2012

Follow Friday - 25 May 2012 - FHISO and Ancestry.com partner


Follow Friday - 25 May 2012 - FHISO and Ancestry.com partner


The Family History Information Standards Organization, Inc. (FHISO) and Ancestry.com, Inc. have finalized plans for Ancestry.com to become a founding member of FHISO. FHISO is being formed as an International organization to develop standards for the digital representation of family history and genealogical information.
 
I wrote about FHISO here in March. FHISO is a "standards-setting organization bringing the international family history and genealogical community together in a transparent, democratic forum for the purpose of developing information standards to solve today's interoperability issues."

Ancestry.comhttp://www.ancestry.com/ is the world's largest online family history resource, with 1.9 million paying subscribers. More than 10 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 year. Ancestry users have created more than 34 million family trees containing approximately 4 billion profiles. I use ancestry.com regularly in my personal research. I am pleased to see they have joined the FHISO efforts.

In addition to its flagship site, Ancestry.com offers several localized Web sites designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history. Do you support international standards in genealogy? I think it is a positive step forward. I hope more major organizations support the cause.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

4 comments:

  1. I use Family Tree Maker for Mac 2 and I like to think (I hope!) that it complies with most, if not all, standards since it is supported by Ancestry itself.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for your comment, Jay. I appreciate you stopping by. Your can keep up with the progress on standards at the FHISO website. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I can't imagine what a standards-based world would look like, I've gotten so used to the . . . ahem . . . eclectic nature of things. Coming from a software background, I do worry a little whenever a commercial entity is at the core of standards. I love and use Ancestry, but I believe in free public data sources and free ways to present trees as well.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I believe we all agree on that, Diggeo. The intent is to have all major players at the collaborative table to assure the freedoms you express are part of any standards that are developed and widely applied. I'm responding as an interested individual, as well, of course, not in any official capacity. ;-)

    ReplyDelete