You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

52 Ancestors: #22 Mary Kinnick



52 Ancestors: #22 Mary Kinnick

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks
on her No Story Too Small blog.


The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I have made this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!

Going back seven weeks… to the first George Washington Kinnick…  now, to another of his sisters, born in Maryland. This time, adding her family to the WikiTree entries.

She would also be a first cousin, five generations removed. Also part of this fascinating family - and, another part of the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.


#22 Mary Kinnick

This family was included in the first book I published about the Kinnick ancestors:

Kinnick Early US Family History

ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/ebook/product-17413775.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/paperback/product-16516494.html


Mary Kinnick was born in Maryland in 1787, before her parents (John and Ann) moved to North Carolina in about 1792. She was their sixth child and and third daughter. [They also had a seventh child and fourth daughter, named Milly, born in Maryland in 1789. She married Basil Hagen, and we know little more of her family.]

She first married Peter Rector, Jr., in May 1804. in Charlestown, North Carolina. He died in 1827 in North Carolina. They had ten sons. [She lived until 1873, married twice more later in life (Peter Rector and Peter Little), and died in Indiana.]

Their children (each born in Rowan Co, North Carolina):

1. John Rector (1806-1872)
2. George Rector (b. 1806)
3. Jacob Rector (1810-1880) married and migrated to Emporia, Lyon Co, Kansas - where I lived for 15 years and was able to do extensive research on his family. ;-)
4. Elizabeth Rector (1812-1899) married David Nugen. [She died in New London, Henry Co, Iowa.]
5. Mark Rector (1813-1854) married Elizabeth Little Lineback in Sep 1841, in St. Joseph Co, IN; where she died.
6. Nancy Rector (1815-1908)
7. Lucinda Rector (1819-1866) married Lewis Hendricks in Nov 1842, in Wayne Co, IN.
8. Patsy Rector (b. Oct 1821)
9. Andrew Jackson Rector (1823-1904) married Elizabeth Walsmith in Dec 1846.
10. Mary Jane Rector (1826-1921) married Phillip Fox in Wayne Co, IN


As shared last week, the descendants of this extended family have also been fascinating to research and write stories about.  There is much more to be done on this family. Aside from Jacob, I've done little personal research not he rest of this family.

The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research.

When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.


What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Today's Thoughts on… Historical fiction based on family history research and life experiences


Today's Thoughts on…
Historical fiction based on family history
research and life experiences


It has been a while since I shared by thoughts on my historical fiction writing that accompanies my family history and genealogy research and writing. As most of you know, this has evolved to the point where it is the creation and continued development of my

"The Homeplace Saga"

series of historical fiction family saga stories on multiple platforms. The link on the name is to the home blog of the saga series.

Earlier today, a post:

http://thehomeplaceseries.blogspot.com/2014/05/todays-thoughts-on-william-mcdonald.html

describes a bit of where I'm at in the story development, along with, later in the post, where my work is going. Point 4, in particular, mentions the "Oak Springs Historical and Genealogical Society" that was created by the characters in the latest novel, "Christmas at the Homeplace," and where they fit in the next full novel. There are also links to continuing shorter stories, on line, free, that can be read immediately.
---------
Additional related stories are being written now on the HubPages platform, free, on-line, under two different headings:
1) http://drbill-wml-smith.hubpages.com/
and 2) http://homeplaceseries.hubpages.com/

I encourage you to register with HubPages and Follow each of these - you'll get an email each time a new post goes live. …And, you might consider writing a post or two, yourself! You know you have something to say!! ;-)

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

52 Ancestors: #21 Elizabeth Kinnick


52 Ancestors: #21 Elizabeth Kinnick

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

on her No Story Too Small blog.

The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I have made this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!

Going back six weeks… to the first George Washington Kinnick…  now, to another of his sisters, born in Maryland. This time, adding her family to the WikiTree entries.

She would also be a first cousin, five generations removed. Also part of this fascinating family - and, another part of the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.


#21 Elizabeth Kinnick

This family was included in the first book I published about the Kinnick ancestors:

Kinnick Early US Family History

ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/ebook/product-17413775.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/paperback/product-16516494.html

Elizabeth Kinnick was born in Maryland in 1782, before her parents (John and Ann) moved to North Carolina in about 1792. She was their third child and and first daughter.

She married James Harbin in August of 1803 in North Carolina. He died in 1845 in Knox Co, Indiana, he in 1855. They just had two sons.

Their children:

1. Allen Cartright Harbin (1809-1873) married Mary Jane Stevenson in 1846. They had eight children.
2. David Granderson Harbin (1820-1873) first married Sarah Scott in 1842; they had a son. She died in 1845. He second married Louisa Ann Byers in 1847. Then had ten children.


As shared last week, the descendants of this extended family have also been fascinating to research and write stories about.  There is much more to be done on this family.

The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research.

When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.


What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

52 Ancestors: #20 Susannah Kinnick


52 Ancestors: #20 Susannah Kinnick

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks
on her No Story Too Small blog.

The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I have made this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!

Going back five weeks… to the first George Washington Kinnick…  now, to one of his sisters, born in Maryland. This time, adding her family to the WikiTree entries.

She would also be a first cousin, five generations removed. Also part of this fascinating family - and, another part of the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.

#20 Susannah Kinnick

This family was included in the first book I published about the Kinnick ancestors:

Kinnick Early US Family History

ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/ebook/product-17413775.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/paperback/product-16516494.html


Susannah Kinnick was born in Maryland in late November 1786, before her parents (John and Ann) moved to North Carolina in about 1792. She was their fifth child and and second daughter.

She married John Harris, in North Carolina, in 1804. They had 7 children. A number of the most active "Kinnick" researchers of this family that I worked with, over the past 20 years, actually descended from this "Harris" line!

Their children:

1. William Henry Harris (1805-1861) married Mary Elizabeth Groce in 1832
2. Alsa Harris (1811-1868) married Jacob Groce in 1835
3. Nathan Harris (1814-1897) married Nancy Caoline Groce
4. Caswell Harris (1818-1890) married Nancy C. Farnsworth in 1853, in Johnson Co, IN
5. Mary Emmeline Harris (1822-1895) married her first cousin, John Adam (Jack) Kinnick in 1851, in Johnson Co, IN
6. Clarissa Harris (1823-1885) married William G. "Joseph" Grose in 1840, in North Carolina
7. Louisa D. Harris (1828-1900) married Edmun Canon Jones in 1851

Note: 4 of the Harris children married members of the neighboring Groce/Grose family.

As shared last week, the descendants of this extended family have been fascinating to research and write stories about.  There is much more to be done on this family.

The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research.

When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.


What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

52 Ancestors: #19 John Adam Kinnick


52 Ancestors: #19 John Adam Kinnick

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

on her No Story Too Small blog.


The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I have made this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!


Going back four weeks… to the first George Washington Kinnick… to older sibling John Adam. This time, adding his family to the WikiTree entries.

He would also be a first cousin, five generations removed. Also part of this fascinating family - and, another part of the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.

#19 John Adam Kinnick


This family was included in the first book I published about the Kinnick ancestors:

Kinnick Early US Family History


ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/ebook/product-17413775.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/paperback/product-16516494.html


John Adam Kinnick was born in Maryland in about 1778, before his parents (John and Ann) moved to North Carolina in about 1792. He was their first born child and son.

He married Anney Call in North Carolina in November of 1803. He died in about 1822 and she in about 1845, both in North Carolina.

Their children:

1. Mary (Polly), b. 1806, married William Etchison in 1828
2. Sarah (1809-1876)
3. Temperance (Tempy), b. 1813, married Edward Lee in 1852
4. John Adam (Jack), b. 1817; d. 1893, Johnson Co, IN; married Mary Emmeline Harris
5. Incy Jane (1819-1872) married William Pulaski Chamberlain in Hot Springs, AR
6. Elizabeth (b. 1821)

Their one son, Jack, and his wife, Mary Emmeline Harris (his first cousin; she was a daughter of John and Susannah (Kinnick) Harris - Susannah a daughter of John and Ann Kinnick - We will do Susannah as #20, next week), had eight children born in Johnson County, Indiana; most lived to adulthood and had children of their own.


As shared last week, the descendants of this family have been fascinating to research and write stories about.  There is much more to be done on this family.

The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book, that has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research, had virtually nothing on this particular family. She did not recognize that David and his family had moved to Tennessee.

When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.

What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Surname Saturday - BALLARD




Surname Saturday - BALLARD


BALLARD is a collateral surname in my family history research - (Martin) Grant Ballard was a half-brother of my father. He appeared in my mother's 1939 diaries twice this week, sparking conversations among readers (here and here)… including on Facebook.

Doing a little background research, in census records, that I had not previously pursued, turned up some interesting aspects that I want to share today.

The pivotal U.S. Federal Census entry in 1900, Union Township, Carroll County, Iowa, where he is listed as a Farmer:

Monty G. (Montgomery Grant) Ballard, 26, with wife, Ella, 20, and son, Martin, 3/12.

Ella Preston first married Montgomery G. Ballard and had a son, Martin Grant Ballard on 2 February 1900. According to family tradition, Monty died on 30 Dec 1900, from a fall from a ladder, adjusting Christmas lights. Young Grant (as he was called as he grew up) was not yet a year old.


Ella with young Grant - about the time she married William Smith

On 11 May 1904, Ellen Rebecca Preston Ballard married my grandfather, William Emanuel Smith. They had 10 children, including my father, Delbert Leverne. I have always wondered where that first name, which he never used, came from… Well, now, the "rest of the story!"

The 1880 U.S. Census for Blair, Washington County, Nebraska, discloses the following useful information:

Martin Ballard, 56, KY, KY, KY, Lawyer
Sarah Ballard, 40, OH, VT, VT
Adelbert, 14, IA
Hattie, 10, NE
Monte, 7, NE
Grace, 2, NE

I strongly suspect that Delbert came from Monte's older brother, Adelbert… what do you think?

Three other related federal census entries are instructive:

1900 Blair, NE
Sarah Ballard, 59, Wd, OH, VT, VT
Grace Ballard, 22

1910 Blair, NE
Sarah D. Ballard, 70
Grace Ballard, 32

1930 Blair, NE
Sarah D. Ballard, 89
Harriett Ballard, 55
Grace Ballard, 50

At this point, I do not know the story of how Monte got to Coon Rapids, Carroll Co, Iowa, to marry Ellen Preston. It may be in Smith stories, and I've forgotten. Newspaper stories may also disclose more on this, as well.

Finally, looking at the 1940 census, browsing Ballard names and their origins (birthplaces) discloses several other BALLARD families in Carroll, Guthrie and Greene Counties from different origins in the area; no reason any of them were related.

Always more to learn, when one studies Family History!!

Families are Forever! ;-)