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If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

52 Ancestors: #18 David R. Kinnick


52 Ancestors: #18 David R. Kinnick
 

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:



52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks
 on her No Story Too Small blog.


The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I have made this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!

Going back three weeks… to the first George Washington Kinnick… to his sibling David. This time, adding his family to the WikiTree entries.

He would also be a first cousin, five generations removed. Also part of this fascinating extended family - and, another part of the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.

 
#18 David R. Kinnick
 
This family was included in the first book I published about the Kinnick ancestors:

Kinnick Early US Family History (this is a different book than I featured the last couple of weeks)
 

ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/ebook/product-17413775.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-smith/kinnick-early-us-family-history/paperback/product-16516494.html


David R. Kinnick was born in Maryland in about 1780 before his parents (John and Ann) moved to North Carolina in about 1792. He was their second born child and son, after John Adam, and before Elizabeth and George Washington.

He married Sarah Rector, in May of 1804, in Surry Co, North Carolina. They had eleven children, most of whom lived into adulthood and had children of their own. The first eight were born in North Carolina before the family migrated west into Tennessee in about 1820 where the last three were born.

Their children:

1. Elizabath (b. 1805)
2. Nancy (b. 1806)
3. Qunicy (1808-1811)
4. John (1809-bef 1910)
5. George (1812-?)
6. Joanne (1814-?)
7. Youry (1815-1894)
8. Susan "Patty" (1819-?)
9. Martha (1822-?)
10. Mary "Polly" (1823-1870)
11. Murry Riley "Riley" (1834-1874)

The descendants of this family have been fascinating to research and write stories about (and share information with!). This is the only family I have to research that lived in Tennessee. And, I've only scratched the surface. There is much more to be done on this family.

The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book, that has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research, had virtually nothing on this particular family. She did not recognize that David and his family had moved to Tennessee.

When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.


What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

52 Ancestors: #17 George Washington Kinnick-"Wash"




52 Ancestors: #17 George Washington Kinnick-"Wash"
 

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

on her No Story Too Small blog.


The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I plan to make this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!

Continuing from the last two weeks… This time, starting with WikiTree entries. A weekly reminder got me off onto this series of three father and son set of George Washington Kinnicks - a fascinating family - and, the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.

This is the third of the three Georges:

#17 George Washington Kinnick-"Wash"


This George Washington Kinnick is the son of #16 (grandson of #15), and is designated by a nickname, "Wash". In later years, on the census, for example, he was using George W. ;-)

Each of these families was included in the book I wrote about them:




ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-william-l-smith/george-and-hannah-kinnick-family-history/ebook/product-17410175.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-william-l-smith/george-and-hannah-kinnick-family-history/paperback/product-5168149.html


"Wash" was born in Villisca, Iowa, a few miles to the southwest of where I grew up. [When I was in high school, active in Methodist Youth activities, Villisca had a very active group, as well. I served with a young man there on the state level organization (South Half of the State of Iowa) as an officer - he was president, I was vice-president. Small world.]

George Washington Kinnick-"Wash" was born in Jun 1863 and died in Feb 1959, at home, in Lewistown, Montana. His wife was Emma Ida Briggs (b. Aug 1867, Iowa) whom he married in Sep 1884, in Taylor Co, Iowa.

Their children were:

1. Leslie C. (b. May 1886, Taylor Co, Iowa; d. May 1952, Grass Range, Montana)
2. William R. (b. Feb 1888, Iowa; d. Oct 1960, Grass Range, Montana)
3. Letha May (May) (b. Mar 1890, Iowa) married James Dudley
4. Alma M. (b. Jan 1899, Wyoming; d. Jul 1993, Fergus Co, Montana) married Frances Linsley
5. Alice V. (b. Jul 1906, Montana) married Glenn Carr

The 1940 census found George W., 76, Emma, 72, and William R., 51, living to living together in Fergus, Montana.

As shared last week, the descendants of this family have been fascinating to research and write stories about. And, I've only scratched the surface. I am now Facebook Friends with some of the descendants of this family. The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book, that has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research, was primarily focused on this family - which was a major contribution of all we know about the extended family history. When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.


What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

52 Ancestors: #16 George Washington Kinnick Jr.


52 Ancestors: #16 George Washington Kinnick Jr.

This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:



52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

on her No Story Too Small blog.


The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I plan to make this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!

Continuing from last week… This time, I'm starting with WikiTree entries. A weekly reminder got me off onto this series of three father and son sets of George Washington Kinnicks - a fascinating family - and, the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.

The second of the three Georges:

#16 George Washington Kinnick Jr.

This George Washington Kinnick is the son of #15, and is designated Jr. His son, who will be #17, often went by the nickname "Wash."



Each of these families was included in the book I wrote about them:

ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-william-l-smith/george-and-hannah-kinnick-family-history/ebook/product-17410175.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-william-l-smith/george-and-hannah-kinnick-family-history/paperback/product-5168149.html

George Jr. was born in Moxville, Davie Co, NC, on 18 Oct 1825. He married Sarah Melissa Reavis (1834-1870). They were part of the major migration of this extended family in 1850 to Indiana.

Their children were:

1. Martha Cathrine (b. 1851, Indiana)
2. Mahala (b. Apr 1853, Indiana)
3. Hannah E. (b. 1857, Iowa)
4. Chloa Ellende "Cloe" (b. 1859, Clarinda, Iowa)
5. Edith Clarissa (1860, IA - 1862)
6. George Washington "Wash" (b. 1863, Villisca, Iowa; d. 1959, Lewistown, Montana)
7. John Harvey (b. Aug 1866, Iowa; d 1955)
8. Sarah G. (b. Sep 1868, Iowa; d. 1868, Iowa)
9. Solomand (b. 1869, Iowa; d. 1959, Lewistown, Montana)

As shared last week, the descendants of this family have been fascinating to research and write stories about. And, I've only scratched the surface. I am now Facebook Friends with some of the descendants of this family. The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book, that has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research, was primarily focused on this family - which was a major contribution of all we know about the extended family history. When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.

What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Friday, April 11, 2014

100 Years Ago This Week - In our Hometown - Coon Rapids, Iowa


100 Years Ago This Week
In our Hometown
Coon Rapids, Iowa
 

From the Coon Rapids Enterprise, Thursday, April 10, 2014, Page 5:

100 Years Ago
April 3, 1914


Norman D. Wilson died at his home Monday night, being in failing health for a year or more, having kidney trouble. The community has sustained in his death the loss of an excellent citizen. He was a pioneer who helped largely in the development of the locality.

He was a staunch republican and for many years prominent in party conventions, county, state and also a faithful member of his church at the Star, always exerting good influence. He was a printer before the war and was therefore always interested in newspapering and always made at home in the print shops of the county which he visited often. He was a
loyal member of the Perry Wright Post and upon the death of “Dad” Mowder became color bearer.

A short history of his life, prepared a year ago and published in the Enterprise, is here re-produced.

Norman D. Wilson was born in Illinois, June 28, 1844. Following the trade of printer beginning his apprenticeship when he was but 10 years of age, which trade he followed until 1876, his last work being on the Prairie City News.

Enlisted in 1864, he was a member of Co. H 134th Illinois Infantry and was elected corporal on May 20 of same year. Come October, when the governor of Missouri wired the governor of Illinois that troops were needed to defend St. Louis against the army of Gen. Price, the entire nine Illinois regiments, which had just been mustered out, volunteered to protect Missouri’s capitol and arrived at St. Louis Saturday of the same week. They remained in Missouri about two weeks, Gen. Price in the meantime having retreated, and an engagement was thus
avoided. The regiments returned home, not receiving any pay for their two week’s service in protecting St. Louis.

He served under Gen. Rosecrans. Mr. Wilson has the distinction of receiving from President Lincoln, on the part of Governor Olegsive of Illinois and signed by President Lincoln and Secretary Edwin M. Stanton, a certificate of thanks for valiant service rendered as 100 day men in the closing days of the war.

Mr. Wilson is the only veteran at Coon Rapids or in the locality who has such a certificate. Of course he prized it very highly.

Norman D. Wilson was married to Miss Mary E. Offill November 16, 1871 at Newton. Five children, all living, were born to them: Mrs. Anna L. Brown, Mrs. Lulu Snyder, Mrs. Hazel F. Bolger, and Misses Laura M. and Rhoda L.

Mr. Wilson followed farming since moving to Coon Rapids in 1877, owning a good farm north of town known as Far View, from which point one can see a point for four miles of Panora, 25 miles distant, Coon Rapids, Scranton, Glidden and on a clear day almost to Jefferson.

The funeral occurred yesterday atthe Star church, a very large number of friends attending, the sermon being preached by his pastor, Rev. Carl Brown. The remains were interred in the Coon Rapids cemetery. The Veteran Drum Corps took a prominent part in all the services.

*****
A tribute to Norman D. Wilson was recently published by his great, and great-great, granddaughters, Nancy Smith and Annette Lamb. It is available to everyone at Amazon.com.
 

http://www.amazon.com/One-Hundred-Days-Norman-Wilson/dp/1493556134/


Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

52 Ancestors: #15 George Washington Kinnick and Hannah




52 Ancestors: #15 George Washington KINNICK and Hannah


This year, Amy Johnson Crow has issues a new 52 weeks blogging challenge:


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks
 
on her No Story Too Small blog.


The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor. Not only should this get me blogging more, but also to take a deeper look at some of the people in my family tree.

My approach: I plan to make this a Tuesday Theme, and, use it to enhance my WikiTree ancestor profiles. That is, focus on a different ancestor on my WikiTree list of profiles, each week (include possibly adding new profiles), Great idea! Thanks to Randy Seaver's post for bringing this to my attention!


After a three week hiatus, I'm starting up again with a slight twist, to fit with other stuff I'm working on… This time, starting with WikiTree entries. A weekly reminder got me off onto this series of three father and son sets of George Washington Kinnicks - a fascinating family - and, the largest single groups of KINNICK surnames in the country (counting their descendants). My mother was a KINNICK, of course.

#15 George Washington Kinnick and Hannah


This George Washington Kinnick was my first cousin, five generations removed. George and Hannah raised ten children who all lived to adulthood and had families of their own - some even larger. A few years ago, I even wrote a book about them:





ebook:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-william-l-smith/george-and-hannah-kinnick-family-history/ebook/product-17410175.html

print book:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/dr-bill-william-l-smith/george-and-hannah-kinnick-family-history/paperback/product-5168149.html

George was born in Davie Co, North Carolina, in 1784. He married Hannah Grimes about 1806. Along with many other family members, they moved by covered wagon, in about 1851, to Johnson County, Indiana, where they spent the balance of their lives, as did many of their descendants. Many others, of course, moved on across the country as then sought their own lives. George died in 1865, Hannah in 1860.

Their children were:

1. Johanna (1807-?) Barlow
2. John (1809-1891)
3. Jabez Grahm (1812-1891)
4. Nancy Smarr (1815-1892) Allen
5. Elijah B. (1817-1849)
6. Sarah (1820-1889) Sheek
7. George Washington, Jr. (1825-c. 1885)
8. Dempsey C. (1828-1912)
9. William (1830-1912)
10. Penelope (Nellie) (1833-1923)

The descendants of this family have been fascinating to research and write stories about. And, I've only scratched the surface. The 1953 Kinnick Genealogy Book, that has been the starting point for much of my KINNICK family history research, was primarily focused on this family - which was a major contribution of all we know about the extended family history. When I compiled, with the aid of nearly 100 other contributors, the 2003 Online KINNICK Genealogy Book, in 2003 (nearly 900 online pages, inter-linked) - the 50th anniversary of the earlier work - we extended the family history to all KINNICK descendants that we could identify. It has become the definitive work on the KINNICK Surname, and is the basis for the One-Name Study currently continuing the work.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kinnick/

What fun! ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)