You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Treasure Chest Thursday - Sing Children Sing Song Book


Treasure Chest Thursday - "Sing Children Sing" Song Book






From storage... Nancy and I each have one of these, from Sunday School at Star Methodist Church, north of Coon Rapids, Iowa.

"Sing Children Sing" by Edith Lovell Thomas; New York City, July, 1939 (when I was born!)

Here is the inside cover, of mine! "Billy Smith"
[It says on left: To The Poets and Musicians who Pitched these Songs for Children's Voices]


I certainly remember using these as a youngster, in the 1940s.

Here was one of the more popular songs - All Things Bright

"All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small,
All things wise and wonderful: The Lord God made them all.





Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - January 1943 Image


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - January 1943 Image


This would be my wife and I, 70 years ago this month...





Nancy and I are the two in front - 3 and a half years old!
Guess we've known each other for "a while!"
We'll celebrate our 54th Wedding Anniversary this summer...

Neat car in the background.
Nancy's brother, Bob, far left; far right, her sister, Carolyn
Other two are neighbors


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, January 28, 2013

To Participants of Book Blog Tour


To Participants of Book Blog Tour

Have you taken the Participant Survey?
Denise would appreciate each participant in the tour to take this survey:


Only take it once, of course. Thanks for taking a few minutes to do this!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, January 27, 2013

FHWC - Feb 2013 - Entry 1


The Family History Writing Challenge
Feb 2013 - Entry 1


A week ago, I decided not to be involved in The FHWC this year. Then, yesterday, I finished my Final First Draft of the Novella I was working on, and I got Lynn's first newsletter (I was still on the list from last year, obviously)… I need a distraction from wanting to "rush on with" the First Draft.

So, I am going to Pledge 250 words a day, in February, on my non-fiction work (that keeps getting put off): "The World of Sergeant Major William Kinnick, Revolutionary Soldier" (working title).

Most of the research is in place, I've written a lot, but I need to work on lots of "bits and pieces" here and there in the manuscript. That is why I'm pledging the 250 words a day. That is one page of new material - not too much - just about right - to get it to the next stage of production.



I'll make a blog post here, from time to time, during the month, to discuss my progress.

Thanks, Lynn, for the continued encouragement!!


Families are Forever!  ;-)



Saturday, January 26, 2013

End of Blog Book Tour Report


End of Blog Book Tour Report


 Last week I was pleased to participate in the Blog Book Tour for Denise Levenick's
"How to Archive Family Keepsakes"

The two week tour ended yesterday, and I am pleased share the following note from Denise with you:

"I'd appreciate  your help getting the word out about the giveaway winners; I need them to contact me with their addresses and email. Here is a list of all winners:

Week 1 Winner of the Family History Photo Archive Kit --
Mary Nelson, commenter at 4YourFamilyStories
Week 1 Runners Up, free copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes -- 
Annemarie Taylor, commenter at 4YourFamilyStories
Tina Telesca, commenter at The Armchair Genealogist
Week 2 Winner of the Family History Oversize Archive Kit -- 
Robyn, commenter at The Practical Archivist
Week 2 Runner Up, free copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes -- 
Cheryl Smallwood-Roberts, commenter at The In-Depth Genealogist
Twitter Tweeter Winner, free PDF copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes --
MariannSRegan

FaceBook Friend Winner, free PDF copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes --
Eli Melitz
Google+ Winner, free PDF copy of How to Archive Family Keepsakes --
Jenna Mills"





Denise Levenick
http://www.thefamilycurator.com



Families are Forever!  ;-)


Thursday, January 24, 2013

Treasure Chest Thursday - Miss Wire at Coon Rapids School


Treasure Chest Thursday
Miss Wire at Coon Rapids (IA) School

This photo now has multiple meanings from days gone by (taken Dec 1952).

The most recent is: They just tore down the last part of this building very recently.


This is "Miss Wire" - kindergarten teacher, of my younger brother, Tom (now T.K.)

He was the first of my younger brothers to start to town school, from the farm.

This was a very early photo taken on my 'new' slide (35mm) Kodak camera!


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Maternal Grandparents 40th Anniversary


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday
Maternal Grandparents 40th Anniversary





August 1954 photos of Paul and Dorothy (Sorensen) Kinnick 40 Wedding Anniversary
Above with three children and their spouses.
Below, with some of their siblings and spouses.


Top photo: left to right, Edward (Buzzy) and Colleen (Davis) Kinnick (their daughter Cindy), Pete and Eileen (Kinnick) Smith, Dorothy and Paul Kinnick, Leo and Ida Marie (Bell) Kinnick.

Lower photo: left to right, Wilson and Lucile (Kinnick) Herron, Rasmus and Louise (Sorensen) Neilsen, Dorothy and Paul Kinnick, Edna (Hull) Kinnick [widow of Robert], Delbert and Lillian (Kinnick) Ford.

Reception held at farm home of Pete and Eileen Smith, northeast of Coon Rapids, Iowa.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, January 18, 2013

How to Archive Family Keepsakes Blog Book Tour

 

"How to Archive Family Keepsakes" 
Blog Book Tour

Guest Post by Author Denise Levenick

First, Save History, Then Share It
Although Dr. Bill and I have never met, I feel like we are old friends. How could that be? We don’t email, share Tweets or FaceBook “Likes,” or post on each other’s Pinterest boards. I feel a connection to Bill because of the stories he spins on this blog. Whether he’s remembering a favorite relative or recalling an interesting time or place, Dr. Bill reminds me that ancestor stories are what family history is really all about.
Today’s Guest Post for the Blog Book Tour features an excerpt from my new book How to Archive Family Keepsakes on the role of the Creator who inherits an ancestor’s stories, photos, and artifacts. I hope you enjoy reading about the many opportunities for creating ancestor stories from your own family archive.

Guest Post by Denise May Levenick, The Family Curator, author of How to Archive Family Keepsakes (Family Tree Books, 2012). 
 
People who inherit family archives often fall into one of three categories: the Curator, the Creator or the Caretaker. The Curator can’t wait to open those boxes and get everything sorted and organized. The Creator sees possibility, too. Writers, photographers, filmmakers, scrapbookers, and family historians are all creators who see potential projects in the depths of a family archive. In their excitement to create something from what they’ve found, creator-types can find it difficult to pause and organize, and then to pause again to preserve the materials they have used. The Caretaker, on the other hand, might be just as happy to push the cartons to the back of the garage and forget about them, but in good conscience, he can’t. It just wouldn’t be responsible.
The Role of the Creator
A family history archive is an exciting resource for genealogy, scrapbooks, albums, films, and other creative projects. Even mass-market greeting cards have found a use for vintage family photos. Creative opportunities are everywhere.
If you plan to use a family archive in a creative endeavor, take time to research copyright laws and to obtain any necessary permission from other family members. Ownership of an item does not automatically give you the right to use or reprint an original work.
The women in my family have been great letter writers and I have inherited a great deal of correspondence. According to United States Copyright Law, however, those letters are not mine to reprint or publish until they fall into the public domain, which is seventy years after the death of the author. Until then, the rights belong to the heirs of the authors.
My grandmother Arline corresponded with many friends and relatives and she kept many of the letters she received. Even though those letters belonged to Arline and I inherited them, I cannot reprint them. The contents of those letters are just as protected as the content of any books I inherited from Arline. Fortunately, my grandmother inherited her mother’s things, and her mother had kept many of the letter Arline had written her, so in a round-about way, I did inherit many of Arline’s letters, and because I am her legal heir I am entitled to reprint and publish her works.
Creators should be aware of copyright laws affecting material found in a family archive. Be certain that you have the legal right to print or reuse the work before publishing or using in another form.
Creators will find many ways to use a family archive in their projects — from inspiration, to raw materials, to information sources. Following are a few ideas.

Complete a Family Pedigree

Genealogists and family historians look to family archives for primary research materials to confirm data or help break down brick walls. You may want to learn more about the life of your loved one, or unravel a family mystery.
Use your family archive to focus on finding and preserving vital records, those bits of history that establish who you are and where you came from.
Use good citations to credit the source of your information; your pedigree chart or family history sketch is a creative endeavor based on fact.

Write a Biography

If you plan to write a biography, you will need to save as much as you can that might shed light on the lives of your ancestors, and organize it for future analysis. In addition to vital records to establish lineage, look for items that will put flesh on the bones of your family stories.

Assemble a Scrapbook

Are you an avid scrapbooker? Your family archive can yield wonderful material for a legacy album. Make your project more manageable by prioritizing your heritage projects. Decide if you want to assemble an album featuring your grandparents’ lives, or if you’d rather make a family tree book for your children. Use your family archive to add visual interest to your story by digitizing original documents and photos for your scrapbooks. Look for items that are visually appealing and “tell the story.”

Compile a Family Medical History

Advances in genetic testing and analysis continue to add new possibilities for family health histories. Your intimate knowledge of your ancestors’ life span, illnesses, and cause of death can provide a vital link in a generational health study. Use your archive to add information to your family health history.
As you work with items from your family archive, take time to record the provenance, or history, of the item. Write down who it belonged to and how it came into your possession.

 *****
Excerpt from How to Archive Family Keepsakes: Learn How to Preserve Family Photos, Memorabilia & Genealogy Records by Denise May Levenick (Family Tree Books, 2012). Copyright, 2012, Denise May Levenick. All Rights Reserved. www.thefamilycurator.com.
How to Archive Family Keepsakes (Family Tree Books, 2012) ISBN 1440322236
Paperback / eBook Family Tree Books, Amazon.com, Scribd, iBooks, Barnes&Noble.com. 10% Savings Coupon ShopFamilyTree.

*****

Join the Blog Tour
Join the Blog Book Tour for How to Archive Family Keepsakes January 10-26, 2013 for author interviews, book excerpts, giveaways, and more. Visit the Blog Book Tour Page at The Family Curator website for the complete schedule.
Proceeds from the sale of How to Archive Family Keepsakes during the Book Tour will help fund the 2013 Student Genealogy Grant founded in 2010 in honor of Denise’s mother, Suzanne Winsor Freeman.

Blog Book Tour Giveaways
Comment on daily Book Blog Tour Post
Tweet the Tour Twitter @FamilyCurator #keepsakebooktour
Share the Tour on FaceBook, Google+, Goodreads
It’s easy to enter to win a free copy of Denise’s new book or one of the weekly giveaway prizes. All you have to do is leave a comment to the Blog Tour Post hosted at one of the official tour blogs. Random winners will also be selected from social media comments on Twitter, FaceBook, and Google+.
Each blog tour post comment gives you one chance to win; one entry per post per day, please. Leave a comment at each stop on the blog tour and increase your chances of winning. The lucky names will be announced each Saturday during the tour at The Family Curator.


 About the Author
In every family, someone ends up with “the stuff.” Denise May Levenick is a writer, researcher, and speaker with a passion for preserving and sharing family treasures of all kinds. She is the creator of the award-winning family history blog, The Family Curator www.TheFamilyCurator.com and author of the new book How to Archive Family Keepsakes: Learn How to Preserve Family Photos, Memorabilia and Genealogy Records, (Family Tree Books, 2012).


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Treasure Chest Thursday - Joseph, Jacob & Walter Watson Kinnick


Treasure Chest Thursday
Joseph, Jacob & Walter Watson Kinnick




 Joseph, Jacob & Walter Watson photo: on back in first handwriting & in ink:  “Uncle Joe Kinnick, Uncle Jake Kinnick, Father Walter Kinnick” and under Walter’s name, in pencil & in second handwriting: “Father of Lon Kinnick, Father of Ira Kinnick”


My comments: Walter Watson Kinnick was my great-great grandfather, of course; with his brothers.


Joseph Kinnick (1839-1917)
Walter Watson Kinnick (1840-1919)
Jacob Kinnick (1846-1923)
[Links have stories from my earlier research]

Thanks again to cousin Ellen DeVilbiss. She has preserved and shared these photos from her grandmother, my aunt, Lillian Kinnick Ford.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - William Walter Kinnick 1987 Family Reunion


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday
William Walter Kinnick 1987 Family Reunion



Notes on back of 1987 reunion photos.  Top Photo: Taken last July (1987) at our last reunion.  Left to Right: Tom, me (Dorothy), Ed (shaved off his beard), Fred, Marge (in red), Rachel, Bill - in our backyard.  Bottom photo: Left to Right: Thomas Jesse Kinnick - b. 15 Feb 1921, Fred Walter Kinnick - b. 12 May 1925, Edward Mark Kinnick - b. 31 March 1923, Dorothy Elizabeth Kinnick - b. 6 Feb 1919, William Joseph Kinnick - b. 16 July 1915, on floor - George Alvin Kinnick - b. 4 Dec. 1928    *Note the differences in years from the 1933 photos.

[ See earlier William Walter Kinnick post, and his family photo post.]

Thanks again to cousin Ellen DeVilbiss. She has preserved and shared these photos from her grandmother, my aunt, Lillian Kinnick Ford.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, January 12, 2013

In-Depth Genealogist for 2013


In-Depth Genealogist for 2013



Have you seen the changes for 2013 in the In-Depth Genealogist digi-mag?? Just click the link!

Sign up for a free subscription, today, if you are not yet getting it!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Treasure Chest Thursday - Kinnick Park & Park City home


Treasure Chest Thursday
Kinnick Park & Park City home
Park City, Montana



On back of photo: "Kinnick Park & Park City home" :
Park: This park is called "Kinnick Park" across from the house.  I (Dorothy K. Adams) took these a couple of years ago.  1986
Home: Grandpa & Grandma's (Joseph & Rachel Kinnick) house in Park City.  A man & lady bought the house from my Uncle John (he) lived in it until his death a few years ago.  My sister and I went through it and the lady showed us a beautiful hand painted vase that was Grandma Rachel's and a needle point rug she had done.  Grandma & Grandpa died the same year.  1917 Sept & Nov.


My comments: Joseph Kinnick (1839-1917) and his family had a very interesting life in Montana, after moving from Illinois, and a few years in central Iowa. [The link has my earlier research.]

Thanks again to cousin Ellen DeVilbiss. She has preserved and shared these photos from her grandmother, my aunt, Lillian Kinnick Ford.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Etta and Gracie Kinnick


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Etta and Gracie Kinnick
 

My Great-Grandfather Alonzo Kinnick's two youngest sisters - daughters of Walter Watson and Mary Estelle (Simmons) Kinnick (therefore, my Great-Great Aunts):


From back of photo: "Etta Kinnick (Horton) seated Grace Kinnick (Seyller) standing red hair."

Mary Etta (Etta) Kinnick Horton (1885-1939) - married Simon Garfield (Garfield) Horton (1881-1961

Gracie (Gracie) Irene Kinnick Seyller (1887-1945) - married John Seyller (1883-1952)

Thanks again to cousin Ellen DeVilbiss. She has preserved and shared these photos from her grandmother, my aunt, Lillian Kinnick Ford.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Archive Keepsakes Blog Book Tour


Archive Keepsakes Blog Book Tour


Watch this blog on January 18 for our Guest Post as part of Blog Book Tour of Denise Levenick's "How to Archive Family Keepsakes" - See full schedule at http://www.thefamilycurator.com/book-tour/








 Author Denise Levenick:






Families are Forever!!  ;-)

Monday, January 7, 2013

Stories from Europe - Arrion visits Alsace, France, area


Stories from Europe - Arrion visits Alsace, France, area


Today I am proud to share a story written by my youngest daughter, Arrion Rathsack, who last fall was able to visit one of our ancestor European homelands, with her permission. She and her husband, Ben, took the photos, as well.



"In September 2012, I had the opportunity to visit the Alsace region of France. My great-great-great grandparents Joseph & Beatrix Schmitt were from the region and immigrated to the U.S. along with my Great-Great Grandfather Michael Schmitt born May 16, 1829. I was able to visit the town listed on Michael's birth certificate - Nambsheim. We visited during the fall harvest season and as we approached the town, we were surrounded by corn fields and numerous corn pickers! Very reminiscent of Iowa. Nambsheim is located about 1/2 mile from the Rhine River and the border with Germany. Over the centuries, the area has traded hands between France & Germany. To the west are the Vosges Mountains (and endless grapevines supporting their wine industry.) To the east across the Rhine River is the deep dark Black Forest of Germany (land were many great fairy tales came from!) I knew before I arrived, I would not have specific information about the whereabouts of my ancestors, as they were Tax Collectors and frequently moved from village to village every few years, in addition, their name was very common. They immigrated to the United States in 1845 arriving in New Orleans, LA on June 16, 1845."

We stayed at a B&B in Colmar, France. Visited the Haut-Koenigsbourg, a majestic castle over looking the valley; several villages on the Wine Route; and Triberg, Germany in the Black Forest. I absolutely loved the area and would love to go back and "bike" the wine route."

Colmar

 Thank you, Arrion, for adding to our family history and genealogy story through your visit, photos, and story!


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, January 6, 2013

Sharing Memories - Dr. Bill 2012 articles at The In-Depth Genealogist digi-mag


Sharing Memories - Dr. Bill 2012 articles at 
The In-Depth Genealogist digi-mag


Do you read and subscribe to The In-Depth Genealogist digi-mag? If not, I hope you will click a link below, and sign up, now, for your free subscription via email. You will be glad you did.



Following are my 2012 "The Heritage Tourist" blog posts and articles (following the first in 2013, published today!):

Is South Dakota on Your Heritage Tourism Destination Planning List?




 Might Wisconsin be Your Next Heritage Tourism Destination?

Iowa Heritage Tourism - In the Heartland, a Land of Great Diversity

Michigan Heritage Tourism Offers an Awesome Array of Opportunities

Let's Talk About the National Heritage Areas Concept

Can you be a Heritage Tourist on a 'staycation?'

The State of Mississippi is great heritage tourism destination

The Heritage Tourist looks for Nature Conservation and Preservation

Be Sure to Keep a Travel Journal of Your Heritage Tourism - But, Paper or Digital?

From the largest to the smallest state: Let's consider Rhode Island

The Heritage Tourist in Wyoming

When a Family Vacation Becomes a Heritage Tourism Experience

Support your local cultural heritage organization(s)

The Heritage Tourist visits Colonial America homeland sites

Heritage Tourism Might Take You to Alaska

Support Your Local Cultural Heritage Organization(s)

Considering 'Culture' as the Heritage Tourist

The Heritage Tourist

Be Flexible in Planning Heritage Tourism Trips

Montpelier's 'Archeology Expedition' program is a Heritage Tourist's delight


The Journey Continues

The Heritage Tourist

IDG Welcomes Dr. Bill


What fun it was to review each of these posts at IDG in 2012!
Hope you enjoyed them as well.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, January 5, 2013

Accentuate the Positive 2012 Geneameme - New Ancestor Photo



Accentuate the Positive 2012 Geneameme - New Ancestor Photo


I held off writing anything in way of a retrospective on 2012 until I came across Jill, of her Geniaus blog, where she suggested we: "Accentuate the Positive 2012." I liked that!

So, here is my second item (first was posted yesterday), looking at her Item 2: A precious family photo I found - actually, was shared with me by a cousin…  ;-)


Photo of Second Great Grandmother Ann Eliza Duncan Williams

As noted, throughout the year, at various times, Ellen provided a number of noteworthy family photos that I had not seen before. I thank her, again, very much!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, January 4, 2013

Accentuate the Positive 2012 Geneameme - Top 5 Blog Post Hits


Accentuate the Positive 2012 Geneameme - Top 5 Blog Post Hits





I held off writing anything in way of a retrospective on 2012 until I came across Jill, of her Geniaus blog, where she suggested we: "Accentuate the Positive 2012." I liked that! So, here is my first, looking at her Item 8: My 2012 blog post that received 'the largest number of hits.'
 

My top 5 were as follows, each receiving from 5-10 times the normal number of hits this year (most first):

1. Sharing Memories - Cuban Missile Crisis - October 1962

2. Treasure Chest Thursday - 5 Kinnick Sibling Couples

3. Sunday's Obituary - JoAnn Phelps

4. Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Piano Recital Program July 1962

5. Those Places Thursday - RBS Express (62-63)



The first thing I noticed among these five is the variety of topics.

The second thing was, three of the five have "1962" in the title: 50 years ago!  ;-)

And, although you don't see it here, each of the obituaries I published had very high hit levels.

Guess I'll just keeping doing what I did last year… seems to be working just fine. Thanks to each of you who stop by regularly - and, from time to time!!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, January 3, 2013

Treasure Chest Thursday - Family of William Walter Kinnick, Montana


Treasure Chest Thursday

Family of William Walter Kinnick, Montana


This is another of the fine photo images I received from my cousin, Ellen DeVilbiss, on 4 Dec 2012. She has preserved and shared them from her grandmother, my aunt, Lillian Kinnick Ford. There are more photos of this gentleman's family among those she shared, that you will also see in the days ahead.

Two weeks ago today, I shared the photo of William Walter Kinnick (1866-1946) along with links to the stories I have compiled over the years of his family. Take a look at them now, if you didn't before.

Today, we have a 1933 family photo shared by his daughter, Dorothy, in the mid 1980s. Comments and description below, from the back of the photo, shared by Ellen in an email along with the copy of the photo.


Picture taken in 1933 in our yard.  Mill Creek - Yellowstone Valley 20 miles south of Livingston, MT
From Left : Miguel (Mike) A. Kinnick (Oldest brother, 10 yrs older than Dorothy, born 1909 died 1975) only one deceased
Thomas J. Kinnick - 1921 - lives in Livingston
Fred Walter Kinnick - 1926 - lives in Livingston (wearing overalls)
Lupe Ramona Covarrubias Kinnick (behind Fred) - Mother - 1890 - 1977  she is holding John Lund - 1933- her first grandson
John Lund (baby) now lives in Arizona
Dorothy (me) Elizabeth Kinnick Hurley Adams (behind Mother)- 1919 lives in Livingston
Rachael A. K. Nickeson (peeking out behind Father) - 1911 lives in Lakewood, CA
Lupe Margaret K. Lund Pardee Chase (standing behind Father) - 1912 - lives in Clarkston, WA  Mother of baby John
William Walter Kinnick  - Dad - 1866 - 1946 holding youngest son George
George A. Kinnick - 1930 - lives in W. Burlington, IA
John P. Kinnick (behind Edward) - 1917 - lives in Clarkston, WA
Edward M. Kinnick (in front of John) - 1924 - lives in Livingston
Milton Lund - Marge's first husband - they had 2 children, father of baby John
William Joseph Kinnick - 1914 lives in Santa Maria, CA


Families are Forever!  ;-)

  

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - LVene in High School


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - LVene Smith in High School


I've been holding this one in reserve, and that time has come. It is from the mid-1920s. Front row, 2nd from left, is my aunt LVene (my Dad's sister) - the lady who grew up to do so much of the family genealogy of our Smith family; from which I have greatly benefited. Another relative in the photo, second guy from the left, back row, is Dutch Preston (he would have been a first cousin to LVene). Also, of course, several neighbors and friends from through the years (e.g. Oral Thomas, back row, second from right - he farmed across the section from where I grew up; I went to one-room country school with his son and daughter in the 1940s).



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Writing Plans for 2013

Writing Plans for 2013


1. I now describe 'what I do' in retirement as "Reading and Writing" - I read to write; I write for personal satisfaction. My writing takes many forms, it changes from time to time in order to maintain satisfaction levels.

2. During 2012 I added the commitment to be a monthly columnist for the digi-mag "The In-Depth Genealogist," as The Heritage Tourist. I will continue this in 2013 with one monthly column and one monthly blog post there.

3. I became an active 'lensmaster' on Squidoo.com during 2012 by creating/writing 126 new lenses (webpages) on a variety of topics, with Heritage Tourism and Family History leading the way. I will continue this activity in 2013 at a measured pace. My lenses about books I read have been popular; I will continue to write them. I also write reviews, have guest posts and interviews, and participate in Virtual Book Tours on my blogs, listed below.

4. It seems I need to have each of my five blogs to have the necessary outlets for what I want to write. Each has its own content and focus, and I've noticed the priority among them shifts a bit, month by month. That is fine as it seems to keep me from getting bored.
Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories
Dr. Bill on Retirement
Dr. Bill's Book Bazaar
The Homeplace Series Blog
The KINNICK Project

4. I will continue to write articles each month for Examiner.com on my three topic areas: Springfield Genealogy Examiner, Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner, and (added in 2012) Springfield Heritage Tourism Examiner; two or three articles in each topic, each month.

5. 2012 was a year of research (reading), writing and shifting priorities in my fiction priorities. My only publication was another short story in the OWL Anthology (second in two years). It was the next 'episode' in the 1833 background research for "The Homeplace Series." These two short stories are now being shared on the blog "serialized" over a few months. This will continue as I move toward the publication of a "background" book on the family history of the characters in my "Back to the Homeplace" and "The Homeplace Revisited" novels (working title: "American Centennial at the Homeplace"). This book is anchored by an Extended Short Story about  the Homeplace during the Civil War. In 2013 I also hope to publish my first Mystery: "Murder by the Homeplace" set immediately following the end of "Back to the Homeplace" with characters from that novel having secondary roles in the Mystery novel. Finally, looking the future, I will continue to develop content for "The Homeplace Series" as it moves to a transmedia platform, starting with the existing wiki which will continue to be developed in association with my daughter, Dr. Annette Lamb, and her eduscapes.com and Lamb Learning Group activities. We are also considering an affiliation with an app developer (in the future) to provide multiple transmedia entry points to "The Homeplace Series" content that will continue to be expanded and developed on multiple platforms. ["The Homeplace Forever" - the third in the original trilogy - set in 2006, continues in development, along with stories across all the years from 1833 to the present, and into the future.]

6. Work will continue, off and on, on the non-fiction family history on our Revolutionary War ancestor, Sergeant Major William KINNICK. He is my 5th great-grandfather as well as the 3rd great-grandfather of 1939 Heisman Trophy winner Nile KINNICK, for whom KINNICK Stadium at the University of Iowa is named. There is surely some promotion value there to exploit. I will also continue to research and write on issues related to a non-fiction family history book on my great-grandfather Michael Smith. I am still developing alternative approaches to making this project most effective. These two are unlikely to be finished 2013; but they are still active projects.

7. My actual genealogy work, other that writing for my blogs and elsewhere, largely revolves around projects that come up from time to time from 1) contacts from and with cousins, 2) cooperatively assisting my wife on her several projects, and 3) providing support to our youngest daughter, Arrion, on her family history projects - primarily related to her annual trips to Europe. Arrion visited our Smith family ancestral ground of Alsace (Colmer, France - my paternal line) and Black Forest area in 2012 and a possible visit to Denmark (my maternal grandmother was born in Denmark) in 2013.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Note: This will be posted to each of the five blogs linked above, this year, on January 1.