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Thursday, August 30, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Probate of Will: Heirs-at-law


Treasure Chest Thursday
Probate of Will
Heirs-at-law
Jacob KINNICK

Yesterday, I shared a photo of Jacob and Fanny Kinnick, in old age, noting that he died in 1923, with no children. He came from a large family, and his siblings had large families. His Probate Record file was probably the 'richest' source of genealogy family information I have had the opportunity come upon. I'll share here two pages from the File, really the same information, in two different forms. My grandfather, Paul Kinnick, is listed (since his father had died two months before Jacob).

When I came upon this record, I did not know the location of probably a third of these people, scattered around the country. Really neat!  ;-)

[Click to see larger image]


 
Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Jacob and Fanny KINNICK


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday

Jacob and Fanny KINNICK



As often happens to me, last week I was looking for something else among my photo images and came across this one. I had not seen it for a very long time. The photo image of their gravestone in Illinois was there, as well. She died in 1920, he in 1923. They had no children.


Notice that she was born in 1832, making her 14 years older than him. She was his second wife. He was born in 1846, the first of his family born in Illinois following the move of the family from Belmont County, Ohio - presumably floating down the Ohio River, coming up the Mississippi River and traveling inland to Bureau County in 1844, near Princeton. He had a very successful farm in Gold Township of Bureau County, Illinois.

Jacob was the brother of my 2nd Great Grandfather, Walter Watson KINNICK.

[See more detail on Jacob at this very old website - still pretty good information on family connections!  ;-)]

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 35 - Aug 21-27, 1937


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 35 - Aug 21-27, 1937

My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 35 (Aug 21-27): This week started off busy on Saturday: "Mom canned pickles." But, the rest of the week the diary was really quiet because "Pete and the boys" went on a whole week vacation - 70 miles away, but she never says where they went! They do get back at noon on Saturday!  ;-)


I did want to add one item from the Coon Rapids Enterprise, from August 23, 2012:

75 Years Ago
August 13, 1937


"The new Sinclair Super Service station just completed, opened for business Tuesday with Milo Roberts in charge and Roy Reid as his assistant, E.E. Reid and Dewey Connor, tank wagon men, were also there part of the time. While the new station is now serving the public, its formal opening will not be held until later."


In the 1950s, this station was run by our cousin, Paul Nielsen, and I had the opportunity to work there while I was in high school. It was interesting to see that this was the year it was built and opened.

I look forward to your comments!

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, August 27, 2012

Mug Book Monday - James P. Preston


Mug Book Monday
James P. Preston

This is the first post of this new Daily Blogging Theme, suggested by Miriam at: http://ancestories1.blogspot.com/2012/08/tuesdays-tip-county-histories-and.html
[Thanks to Randy for bringing it to my attention]

(As is so often the case, we know that some of the following is true and some is not. I assume James provided all, or the bulk of, this information during an interview during 1884 or early in 1885. He probably believed it all to be true, at the time. The story is provided here, as written in the History of Montana.)

JAMES P. PRESTON, Deer Lodge valley, is a native of Ohio, born February 22, 1835, at Fort Defiance and is a son of Captain William Preston, an officer of 1812, being the youngest of a family of ten children.

When he was seventeen years old he left his parents, went to California and immediately engaged in mining in Nevada county, and later in Yuba county. He owned an eighth interest in the Blue Gravel Mining Company and worked in this mine for five years. He sold his interests and in 1862 went to Florence, Idaho, and mined until he lost over $20,000. He purchased a claim and opened it, but it failed to pay, as labor was worth $20 per day and board $15 per day, picks, $45 each, shovels, $45 each, and gum boots, $45 per pair. The claim required eight feet of stipping by hand and all supplies were brought in eighteen miles on snowshoes. The claim was rich, but would not pay such a tremendous outlay. After this loss he went to Boise basin $500 in debt, located a claim, and the ensuing year paid his debt of $500 and cleared $20,000. In 1863 he ran a bed-rock cut from Granite creek; flumed the lumber, costing $8,000 per thousand; used 100 inches of water at $100 per inch, and bought out his partner except a 1-6 interest. The mine did not yield as much as was expected.

At this time the mining excitement in Montana was at its height, and in October, 1865, Mr. Preston went to that territory. After visiting various parts he was not pleased with the country, and made preparations to return to Idaho. In the meantime his partner had sold their claim in Idaho, having been given the power of attorney to sell the claim - by Mr. Preston - if he decided to remain in Montana. The claim was sold for $8,000 and partner and money both disappeared. Mr. Preston again suffering a loss of about $12,000. In 1866 he mined on Elk Creek, but was unsuccessful.

He had located his present ranch near Deer Lodge in 1865, and thither he turned his footsteps, resolved in abandon the ups and downs of a miner's life. In the summer of 1867 he was employed as superintendent of constuction of the Rock creek ditch, thirteen miles long, capacity 1,500 inches of water. It was seven feet wide on top, five feet on the bottom and three feet deep. This ditch has proved a good paying investment.

Mr. Preston, in company with John Coffey, had started a livery stable in Deer Lodge City, and during 1868 gave his personal attention to the business. In 1869 he left his partner to attend to affairs and went to Pioneer, purchased a mining claim, which he worked about one month; owning half of the claim. He left his partner in charge of the claim and again took the superintendency of the Rock creek ditch. He sold his Pioneer claim in the fall, clearing some money on it, and bought a claim and ditch in company with Colonel Thornton. In 1870 he lost all he had in mining interests and returned to his livery business in Deer Lodge City.

In the fall of 1870 he returned to the states and on March 21, 1871, married Miss Ellen M., daughter of Jacob and Rebecca Miller, of Williams Co., Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Preston have four children: Ernest G., born February 20, 1872; Henry L., born July 14, 1873; Jake Miller, born October 15, 1874; Ellen Rebecca, born April 1, 1880.

Our subject returned to Montana and continued in the livery business during the summer, and in the fall of 1871 moved to his present ranch. His livery business burned in 1872 and he closed up the business and invested in cattle. He owns 200 acres of land, of which he cultivates about seventy acres, and mows nearly all of the balance, cutting almost eighty tons of hay per annum. He has about thirty head of horses, all well bred, mostly of Mambrino and Morgan stock, besides about fifty head of cattle. The record of this man's life has been one of toil and hard ship, whose conquests are not the result of favorable circumstances but of untiring energy and industry.

[paragraph breaks added here] 

Source:

History of Montana 1739-1885, 1885, Chicago: Warner, Beers & Company

p. 10897, Deer Lodge County section 

  [I first published this at: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~earlyyrs/smith/preston/jppres.html]

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Lyle Sievers Obituary


Lyle Sievers Obituary

From the Coon Rapids Enterprise, March 10, 1988:

Services held for Lyle Sievers

Funeral services for Lyle Sievers, 64, were held at 10:30 a.m. today (Thursday), March 10, 1988, as the United Methodist Church with the Rev. Jerry Robertson officiating.

Lyle died at his home south of Coon Rapids on Monday, March 7 following a lengthy illness with cancer.

Pat Schwartz served as organist and accompanied Marcia Young in vocal selections.

Interment was in the Orange Township Cemetery south of Coon Rapids with military honors by Gurney Parker Post #357 of the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #5554.

Carrying the casket were Kenny Knudsen, Deah Herron, Ric Hilgenberg, Tom Sievers, Larry Hilgenberg and Robert Rattenborg. Serving as honorary casketbearers were Ron Herron, Richard Knudson, Joe Sievers, Tim HIlgenberg, Thomas Nelsen and Glen Knight.

A prayer service was held a 7 p.m. on Wednesday evening, March 9, at Olde Funeral Home in Coon Rapids.

LYLE HOWARD SIEVERS

Lyle was born March 7, 1924 in  Manning, Iowa, the son of Peter Herman and Mary Barnes Sievers. He and his family moved south of Coon Rapids in 1934. He attended school at Union Township and Bayard. Lyle served his country in the Navy during World War II. When he returned home, he worked at Kretzinger Implement in Coon Rapids as a farm machinery mechanic.

On July 21, 1949, he was united in marriage with Shirley Ann Herron at the Methodist Church in Des Moines. To this union three children were born: Robert Dean, Kathleen Ann and Donna Marie.

They live in Coon Rapids for a year and a half when they moved to a farm south of Coon Rapids until 1959 when they moved to their present home. Lyle's greatest pleasures in life were his family, grandchildren, farming and the outdoors.

Lyle was a member of the United Methodist Church in Coon Rapids.

Lyle was diagnosed with cancer in the latter part of January, 1987. He passed away at his home on March 7, 1988 at the age of 64 years.

He was preceded in death by his father in March of 1978.

Lyle is survived by his wife, Shirley of Coon Rapids; and the following children and grandchildren: Robert Sievers and his wife, Cindy and their children Stacey, Shane and Shayla of Granger, Iowa; Kathleen Hite and her husband, Terry, of Madrid, Iowa: and Donna Drees and her husband, Thomas and their daughter, Cassandra Marie of Carroll, Iowa; by his mother, Mary Esther, of the Thomas Rest Haven in Coon Rapids; two sisters: Beatrice Knudsen of Bayard and Ila Knudsen and her husband, Nels, of Mesa, Arizona; one brother, Merlin and his wife, Claribel, of Coon Rapids; and nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.

**********

Lyle and Shirley (Herron) Sievers were active members of the "Kinnick Cousins" - grandchildren of Alonzo and Nettie (Williams) Kinnick. Shirley was a daughter of Wilson and Lucile (Kinnick) Herron of the Coon Rapids, Iowa area.

[This obituary published at both the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories and The KINNICK Project blogs]


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Paul Harold KINNICK


Treasure Chest Thursday - Paul Harold KINNICK


On Saturday, August 18, I posted this photo of my maternal grandfather along with others, for his 120th birthday anniversary...


I also came across this one of Paul, born Aug 1892, along with his sister, Helen Lucile, born Mar 1894... is that cute, or what! ;-) I had not seen either of these in years, but there they were, in my computer... What a pleasant surprise!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 44 years ago


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - 44 years ago
Smith Family beside the church


Pete and Eileen Smith with five sons in 1968.
Outside the United Methodist Church, Coon Rapids, Iowa.
Boys, from left: Tom, Bill, Paul, Jim, Barry
[One of my favorite all-time family photos, personally]


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 34 - Aug 14-20, 1937

Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 34 - Aug 14-20, 1937


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 34 (Aug 14-20): Started week with Pete on week-end vacation to Cedar Falls, with the boys.

Had August 18 birthdays of her Dad and Buzzy. Buzzy got a bicycle. Busy canning corn, at home.
 





I look forward to your comments!

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, August 20, 2012

My Hometown - News Clipping from 50 years ago


My Hometown - News Clipping from 50 years ago


From the current issue of the Coon Rapids Enterprise, 50 Years Ago column, dated August 2, 1962"

"Second Lieutenant William L.
Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. D.
Leverne Smith, of Route 1 Coon
Rapids successfully completed
a course in Introduction to Accounting
II through the United
States Armed Forces Institute,
Madison, Wisconsin on July 18,
1962. Lieutenant Smith graduated
from Coon Rapids High in 1957
and from ISU in Ames in 1961.
Before entering the Service, he
was a computer programmer for
the Space Technology Laboratory,
Incorporated at Los Angeles, CA.
He and his wife, the former Nancy
Bolger, are residing in Winslow,
AZ where he is a Ground Electronics
Officer."

Always interesting to see what appears in the Hometown Newspaper! ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, August 18, 2012

Happy Birthday - Uncle Buzzy and Grandpa Kinnick


Happy Birthday - Uncle Buzzy and Grandpa Kinnick


Happy 84th, Buzzy - just saw him last month, and been talking to him regularly on the telephone





Today, August 18, 2012 is the 120th Anniversary of his birth - Paul Harold Kinnick, my grandfather, father of Buzzy and Eileen and Leo. 

 Paul Harold Kinnick

1964 - 50th Wedding Anniversary
Paul and Dorothy


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - FHISO grows


Treasure Chest Thursday - FHISO grows
One Community - One Standard






WikiTree is the latest new Founding Member of FHISO. To me, this is a current Treasure Chest item, joining the addition of RootsMagic and Ancestry to this very special organization.

I wrote about it yesterday, when the announcement was made, in more detail here and added it here.

Please do read the press release, here, and the earlier ones if you missed them!  ;-)

Congratulations on the continued good work by the supporters of FHISO. And, Thanks! ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)


Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Billie and Buzzy in 1940


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Billie and Buzzy in 1940


I was a little over a year old, I think, and this is my uncle, Buzzy Kinnick, about 12.
This is the Kinnick house, along old 141, in Coon Rapids, Iowa.
Provides an interesting perspective... and neat look at the old houses...
both still there, I think!  ;-)

Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Eileen KINNICK -75 yrs ago - Week 33 - Aug 7-13, 1937

Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 33 - Aug 7-13, 1937


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 32 (Aug 7-Aug 13): This week was Pete's birthday, on August 9. Eileen got him a clock, and gave it to him on their date on August 8.

Did you look at that new photo, from the ledges, that I started using on August 1. I'll include it here, as well. I love the shoes… both of them. Don't think that is Dad's car, from the diary text. This apparently was actually taken on August 1, which is neat. Look them in the face, to see she is 18 years old, and he was just 22.

What are your thoughts?



I look forward to your comments!

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Coon Rapids Enterprise Archives online


 Treasure Chest Thursday
Coon Rapids Enterprise Archives online

This is an image of the pdf file I just saved from on line.
This is page 1 of the first 15 Apr 1882 edition of the
Coon Rapids Enterprise (Iowa) - my hometown paper.

All of the images of all of the issues since (they say) are now accessible at:

http://coonrapids.advantage-preservation.com/

Thank you to every single person and entity that had a part in making this possible!
What a wonderful resource! Enjoy! I certainly will!!  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Younger brother Tom reading narration at rural church


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday
Younger brother Tom reading narration at rural church




My middle (of we five boys) brother, Tom, in December 1959, at the Star Methodist Church, north of Coon Rapids, Iowa, reading a narrative - I assume it was some sort of Christmas pageant. I see it is nearly 9 p.m. Also, that is most likely our mother's sheet music on the piano, of Santa Claus is coming to town - with some hand-written music in front of it - also typical of her. I do not know what the Folgers coffee 'sack' represented????  Love the jacket, open collar and hanky? Those were the days!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 32 - July 31-Aug 6, 1937


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 32 - July 31-Aug 6, 1937


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 31 (July 31-Aug 6): Last week, Eileen began her new job at the new Municipal Light Plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. She and Verna were making out bills for the customers, as you will recall. This week, they are taking in collections.

50 years later, in the Coon Rapids Enterprise I have in my hands, from October 1, 1987, is the following lead article, right column:

******************

Coon Rapids Municipal Utilities
"50 Years of Progress"


The Coon Rapids Municipal Utilities will celebrate 50 years of progress this Sunday with an Open House at the Municipal Building.

A special commemorative edition outlining the history of Coon Rapids Municipal Utilities is inserted in this week's Entertprise.

All area residents should make plans to attend the Open House. There will be many door prizes, refreshments, and video presentations.

*******************

Now, I DO NOT have in my hand the "commemorative edition" referenced, above, BUT:
In the Coon Rapids Enterprise, received here, today, as I write this, in the big article below the fold on the front page, it is announced that ALL of the 6600 issues of the Enterprise are now available to view, online, via the Coon Rapids Library website. Do you suppose that 'commemorative edition" is there?

Yes, indeed it is. Here is the URL to search: http://coonrapids.advantage-preservation.com/

Thanks to all those folks on the Library Board and individual contributors who helped make this possible. One caveat from me: I cannot 'look at' the pages on the site, but, I can download a pdf of each page I find in the search. That is great. Thanks, again, to all concerned. Eileen would have loved this!!  ;-)

I look forward to your comments!

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, August 3, 2012

Follow Friday - 1940 US Census Indexing Project


Follow Friday - 1940 US Census Indexing Project






I assume this will be my last post on this blog with respect to the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project - indexing the 1940 census. In recent days, both this project and the commercial indexing project at Ancestry.com have noted that the 'indexing is complete' in one form or another. I'll make reference to the post of Judy G. Russell, my favorite Legal Genealogist: Indexing: don't stop now as my recommended reading for the day. Read the entire post. She has expressed my sentiments better than I usually do.


Thanks to all who participated in the 1940 U.S. Census project at FamilySearch. I am amazed at how well it went. You can read Randy Seaver's analysis of the indexing projects from a link in Judy's post, above. She also encourages, as I do, each of us to keep doing some indexing regularly, to keep getting more records available, for each of us, online. Thank you for doing that.


Families are Forever!  ;-)


Thursday, August 2, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Jason Bolger 1987


Treasure Chest Thursday - Jason Bolger 1987

[Click once to get larger image]

My Mom and I both like to save and clip from our hometown newspaper, Coon Rapids Enterprise. This is from a stack of old papers I came across that Mom had saved. This is our nephew, Jason Bolger, who was graduating from Coon Rapids-Bayard High School the same year as our daughter, Arrion. They are both 'married with kids' now, of course, which makes this interview even more interesting - 25 years later.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Barbara and Carol Groth w/Eileen and Pete


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday
Barbara and Carol Groth w/Eileen and Pete






Photo from perhaps 1948, in 'Beaverdale' -in northwest Des Moines, Iowa

Pete and Eileen (Kinnick) Smith visit the Groth family - the two girls are Barbara (left) and Carol (right); Carol is a month or so younger that I am... gauged the date by that. The girls are daughters of Alton and Pearl (Sorensen) Groth. Eileen and Pearl were first cousins; Dorothy, Eileen's mother, and Morris, Pearl's father, were brother and sister.

Families are Forever!  ;-)