You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

1940 Census Update and Info


1940 Census Update and Info

The following infographic is provided my the 1940 Census blog; interesting stuff!  ;-)


There is still time to make a major contribution to indexing the 1940 Census images. Get Started, here, today. If you are already indexing, THANK YOU!  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, April 28, 2012

The Heritage Tourist at The In-Depth Genealogist


The Heritage Tourist at The In-Depth Genealogist


I am pleased to announce that I have joined the writing team at "The In-Depth Genealogist: A digi-mag for every genealogist" as a monthly columnist writing as "The Heritage Tourist."




I will be encouraging our readers to incorporate the social context of genealogical and family history travels into their planning, looking specifically at historical, cultural and nature elements and environments. If you travel more than 50 miles from home, you are a tourist. Are you a heritage tourist?

Please sign up to get the next edition of the digi-mag, coming out soon (click on the logo, above, or on the link directly). Be sure to look for The Heritage Tourist column as well as each of the stories written by other members of the team.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Rose May Williams



Treasure Chest Thursday - Rose May Williams

Another photo from cousin, Ellen, of a sweet baby, from 1900, who only lived a month after this photo:


Ellen wrote: Rose May Williams, age 7 mo 2 wks, Feb 16, 1900. Sad to think she died less than a month later.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Early Marriages


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Early Marriages


Two more photos from Ellen, thanks, again!

My great-grandparents wedding

Mr. & Mrs. A. P. Kinnick
July 6, 1891
[Lon and Nettie!]

Their 2nd son's wedding

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Kinnick
December 2, 1914
[Robert and Edna]

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 16 - April 17-23, 1937


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 16 - April 17-23, 1937



My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).


Week 16 (Apr 17-23): Recently, Eileen has been watching and going "bowling." We have wondered what it was. Now we have a Coon Rapids Enterprise article in the 75 Years Ago column that relates to Eileen's diary entries.


75 Years Ago
April 2, 1937

Geo. Lachenmaier announces the opening of a new bowling recreation parlor in the Boehler building over the Cadden clothing store. The new alleys, installation of which will be completed within the week, will be somewhat different from the old fashioned alleys as they are ten feet shorter and the balls are some four or five pounds lighter. Otherwise the game is very similar to the old game of ten pins. It is a new game, however, called “duck pins” and is taking the country by storm. Mr. Lachenmaier will have four alleys in this new parlor, installation of which is to commence at once and to be completed within the week. He expects the game to prove popular with men and women alike and to be the recreational center of the community. The grand opening is announced for next Friday night at which time Mayor Whittle will officially open the alleys by rolling the first ball, following which two mystery men of the community will be matched in the first game. The first night will be ladies night and all ladies may try the new game without charge. Mr. Lachenmaier says the place will
be one of the cleanest and most respectable in town and the ladies will be welcome at all times. He plans to designate Thursday evenings as ladies’ night when part, if not all, of the four alleys will be reserved for their exclusive use. George, a former Amour Creameries employee, says it is going to be hard to get out of the habit of riding a truck or company car, but says “Come up and see me some time.”

Duckpin Bowling at Wikipedia describes the smaller pins, shorter lanes, and smaller balls.


Comments welcomed! 

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, April 20, 2012

Photos from the 1940s


Photos from the 1940s

These are two more that Ellen; I have these somewhere, but just scanned the photo, not the frame. Frames seem to be popular, as well.


Dated Jul 9, 1941... a few days after my second birthday - this is Billie Smith, by the way.

Here I am, a few years later, with brother, Jimmie:


April 25, 1945 - a few days after Jimmie's 1st birthday; a couple of months before my 6th birthday.


Families are Forever! ;-)

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - 30s High School Grads


Treasure Chest Thursday - 30s High School Grads






These three scans are, again, from the collection held by cousin Ellen. She did such a good job of scanning them, I wanted to share these three High School graduation photos together.
Above is my uncle, Leo M. KINNICK, 1935, Coon Rapids, Iowa.




Next, also 1935, in nearby Bayard, Iowa (the school District today, since 1987, is Coon Rapids Bayard Community Schools), is Leo's first cousin, Lyle KINNICK.


One year later, 1936, from Coon Rapids High School, my mother, Eileen KINNICK.

Treasure Chest photo, indeed!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Elias Williams group


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Elias Williams group






This was the first photo in the third batch of Kinnick-Williams photo scans my cousin Ellen was kind enough to send along to me recently. This is the Williams side. Her comment:

"Josephine Brock, Elias & Sarah Williams - Writing is mostly on front.  Back lists names as: Josephine (Brock), Elias Williams & Sarah Williams.  I'd guess this to be around 1900, in which case Josephine was either already married or at least engaged to William Brock.  I wonder if he took the picture?"

William (c1863-c1930) and Josephine 1872-1961) were married Sept 1899, in Coon Rapids, Iowa. Possibly even day of wedding? With her parents?

Sarah (1853, Ireland - 1938) was actually the second wife of Elias, of course; the mother of his children, Ann Eliza, had died so young. The children all considered Sarah their mother; the grandchildren considered her grandma. I think this may actually be the first photo I have of her!  

[Elias is my great-great grandfather; Eileen, Paul, Nettie, Elias, of course.]


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 15 - April 10-16, 1937


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 15 - April 10-16, 1937


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 15 (Apr 10-16): Today I have another article from the recent (29 Mar 2012) Coon Rapids Enterprise in the 75 Years Ago column that relates to Eileen's diary entries and where she now works.

19 March 1937: "Mayor Verne Whitnell announced yesterday that he had bought a lot from the Garst estate facing on Fifth Avenue just south of the Bliss barber shop and the McCorkle Construction company had the contract to erect a one story brick and tile building, 22 x 75, on this site. Mr. Whitnell says work had already begun on the new building and he hoped to be able to occupy it about May 1. He is, however, vacating his present location where he has conducted his hardware store the past 18 years and next week will be located in the Speiker building formerly occupied by the Maytag store. Today and tomorrow, Mr. Whitnell says, will be bargain days at his store as he much prefers selling stock to moving it."

And, just as I was preparing his, the following appeared in the April 12 edition, regarding the south side of that same block. 5th Avenue runs along the right side of building, if I am correct.
  {click image for a larger image}


Comments welcomed! 

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, April 16, 2012

Mappy Monday - Western Iowa of my hometown


Mappy Monday - Western Iowa of my hometown


I used this yesterday on a Shared Memories post, and promised to share more, today, on Mappy Monday. My hometown, Coon Rapids, Iowa, is about in the center of this map segment (2008 Iowa DOT map). I grew up in the corner of four counties: Carroll, Greene, Guthrie and Audubon. East of Guthrie is Dallas County; Des Moines has grown our into Dallas County. Notice that Iowa Highway 141 goes through Coon Rapids and southeast to Des Moines (past Grimes and Urbandale). Nancy's brother, Al, lives just east of Grimes, east of 141, with his wife, Joleen. We visit there once or twice a year.

North of Perry, in northern Dallas county, is Ogden, in Boone county. I have two brothers with homes there. Speaking of brothers, Jim lives in Defiance - at the far left edge of the map image, between Denison and Harlan. Carroll, the county seat of Carroll county, is a regional center. To the east of Carroll, are Glidden (Nancy's sister, Carolyn, lives there), Ralston and Scranton. Directly north of Scranton, in Calhoun county, is Lohrville. Leo Kinnick and his family lived there much of the 1940s, 50s and 60s. We also have close relatives living in Jefferson, Greene County Seat, and Audubon, Audubon County Seat. It really is a small world, after all. P.S. Now that tune will be in your head the rest of the day!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, April 15, 2012

Sharing Memories on Sunday - Paul and Dorothy Kinnick residences


Sharing Memories on Sunday - Paul and Dorothy Kinnick residences

Today is literally "sharing memories" - of my own, from Mom's diary entries, from her two brothers (my uncles, Buzz and Leo; and Colleen, wife of Buzz!) and even brother Jim!

This particular line to thought started with Mom's diary entries but was really sparked by the 1940 US Census images of my grandparents, Paul and Dorothy (Sorensen) Kinnick, and son, Edward (Buzzy), in Coon Rapids, Iowa.

I realized I didn't really know how Paul and Dorothy met (even though I lived around them for many years) and I was much more vague about where they had lived over their years together than I realized. So, to add to my own research, I sent letters to their sons, Leo and Buzzy. I had a long telephone conversation with Buzzy, in response, as expected. Today, I got a nice set of responses, from Leo, via an email from his daughter, Kathleen. In the meantime, I had also talked at length with my brother, Jim, on the telephone, and he added some insights, as well.

Paul Kinnick graduated from Coon Rapids High School in 1909. Buzzy says he has a paper document (in his safe deposit box, he will get me a copy) that is a contract by Lon Kinnick (Paul's father) to buy some land near Greenfield, Adair County, Iowa (about 50 miles south and a little east of Coon Rapids), around this time. This would account for Paul traveling between Coon Rapids and Greenfield in this time period. Leo said: "I think mom did house work in Stuart and Greenfield." Stuart straddles the Guthrie and Adair county line, about 20 miles north and east of Greenfield (the Adair County Seat).  Somewhere along the way, Paul met Dorothy Sorensen (she and her parents had arrived in Stuart from Denmark in about 1904; her mother died within a year of their arrival; as the oldest child, she was soon working). Another Leo quote: Dad and Uncle Robert were picking corn and if either found an ear of Indian corn they got to make a wish.  Dad found one and said "I wish I could kiss that Dorothy Sorenson.  He got his wish!" They were married on 12 Aug 1914, in Greenfield. 


{Here is useful map. I'll also do a Mappy Monday, tomorrow, with this map, and talk more about the area covered. For now, Coon Rapids is near the center, Greenfield in near the bottom, right center.}


They made their first home, just "South of town in a 2 story stucco house.  Eileen and I lived there too." [Quote from Leo, referring to Coon Rapids; confirms what Mom had told me! (more on this later)] Leo was born there in Mar 1917, Eileen in Dec 1918. From Mom: The little white house sits just east of Shirbroun's big barn. By August of 1928, when Buzzy was born, they were all living on Main Street (in the house where Irene Fick was living in 1997).

They moved from the Main Street house in June 1936 to the farm northwest of town (where Lon and Nettie had lived). By the time of the 1940 census, they were living back in town, in the house on old 141, now Elm Street (assume it was called 2nd Street in 1940 - east-west street, two blocks north of Main Street). According to Buzzy, they moved from there out to the "Harvey Place" on the Glidden Road.,, the Bass family lived there in the 1960s and later… Buzzy said he went to High School ('42-'46) from there. Also, from fall of '46 to Jan '48, he was in Japan in the Army - I remember his return home to that house. He reminded me that Paul Nielsen (Dorothy's nephew) came and helped farm while he was gone, and, my Dad, Pete, came over and helped out as well. I remember that, with his reminder!

When Buzz and Colleen were married in Jun 1948, they made that their home, and Paul and Dorothy moved into the Trailer House I mentioned earlier, north of our house on our farm. Colleen says she has seen a photo of Tom, about 3, with them in the house in Bayard - that would have been 1951. That all comes out about right. THANKS to all!


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, April 14, 2012

Surname Saturday - Duncan (II)


Surname Saturday - Duncan (II)


Earlier Surname Saturday - Duncan

"Ann Eliza DUNCAN (1842-1879) married Elias WILLIAMS (1838-1920) on 20 Apr 1862 in Mercer Co, Illinois. They had 3 children who lived to adulthood. When the youngest of these, Josephine, was 3 years old, they moved to Iowa in 1875... first to Scranton, then to Coon Rapids shortly thereafter, where they lived the rest of their lives.

Ann was the daughter of Braxton DUNCAN (1798-1859) and  Araminta KIRK (1813-1855). Braxton was the son of Charles DUNCAN (1761-1838), a Revolutionary War soldier from Virginia (1777-1780)."

Charles DUNCAN was Scotch-Irish, and went to the Revolutionary War at the age of seventeen from Fauquier County in the Northern Neck of Virginia (enlisted 12 Jan 1777 to serve 3 years - per letter from the War Dept, 10 Nov 1900). He fought under Col. Buford, lived to a good old age, and raised a large family of children. (Written by a grand child of his youngest son, Braxton). He named his first son Buford, after Col. Buford. In the Deed Book of Fauquier County (1778-1785), Charles DUNCAN is regularly mentioned as he acquired his wealth in land.

Buford DUNCAN was the first settler of Mercer County, Illinois, in 1838, in Duncan Township which came to be named for him. He may have visited the area as early as 1834 or 1846, depending on your source of information. He was followed by his brother, Braxton, and other neighbors, friends and family from Virginia. The settlement was known as the Duncan Settlement, in the early years.

Duncan Township was just a few miles southwest of (what became) Rock Island, Illinois, as you can see on the map section (along the north border of Mercer Co, second Twp in from the Mississippi River on the west).




As I mentioned earlier, I believe this is my only family that came through the State of Virginia (and also the furthest south family line).

Addendum: Charles DUNCAN Rev War Pension files information.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, April 13, 2012

1940 US Census Indexing - Personal Update


1940 US Census Indexing - Personal Update


I was very pleased to see that Iowa images were now being indexed via FamilySearch and the the related Community Project we have all been promoting.

So, I went and indexed a few batches of Iowa images - in a county where some of my ancestors lived many years ago - Adair County. It was fun, felt good, and gave me an excuse to say:


If you haven't indexed any 1940 US Census images, yet, it is still not too late. Just go to the link, above, and Get Started, as it says (or, click on the logo, below!). More hands make the work go faster - for the benefit of everyone!



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Treasure Chest Thursday - Great-Great Grandmother Ann Eliza Duncan


Treasure Chest Thursday
Great-Great Grandmother Ann Eliza Duncan


This is one of the cases where a photo really is a Treasure Chest item. I had not seen this until a couple of days ago. It, again, comes from the collection of my cousin, Ellen DeVilbiss (see information yesterday), from her grandmother, my grandfather's sister.


Ann Eliza Duncan (1842-1879) married Elias Williams (1838-1920) in 1862. After having had five children between 1866 and 1876, she had twins in 1879. She and one of the twins died shortly thereafter. My records show that only three of these children reached adulthood, including my great-grandmother, Nettie (who married Alonza Kinnick). We are extremely fortunate to have such a marvelous photo of a lady who died at age 37 in 1879!  ;-) Thank you, again, Ellen for sharing this with the rest of the family, and the world, for that matter.

[This is the information Ellen provided with the photo: Ann Eliza Duncan - born in 1842 in Mercer Co. Illinois.  Married Elias Williams (b. Jan 29, 1838).  Mother of Lemuel Benson (July 1, 1866); Margaret Jeannette (Kinnick) (Sept 20, 1869); Josephine (Brock) (Dec. 20, 1872); Rose; Robert; Twins - Bertha & ---  Ann died in childbirth Sept 22, 1879 & lost 1 twin  Mr. & Mrs. High Smith adopted Bertha.  (This is taken from a copy.)]

I will write more about Ann Eliza Duncan and her family line (from Illinois and Virginia) on Saturday in a Surname Saturday, Duncan update. This is my only one of the 'round of 16' grandparents that came through Virginia, I believe.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - Paul, Lucile, Robert with Aunts Etta and Grace


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday
Paul, Lucile, Robert with Aunts Etta and Grace


Grace & Etta Kinnick with Paul, Robert & Lucile

In recent days, I have been so pleased to re-connect, on line, with a Kinnick cousin, out in Colorado, Ellen DeVilbiss, daughter of Roberta (Ford) and Bill Keister, granddaughter of Lillian (Kinnick) and Delbert Ford, great-granddaughter of Alonzo and Nettie (Williams) Kinnick.

The photo shared, above, is from Ellen from the collection left to her by Lillian. I had not seen this photo before, and it may to youngest photo I have seen of my grandfather, Paul Kinnick (1892-1968), left front. The Caption is as provided by Ellen. Center front is Paul's brother, Robert Kinnick (1896-1953); on the right front is their sister, Lucile Kinnick (1894-1956). They are three oldest children of Alonzo and Nettie (Williams) Kinnick. I date the photo to about 1899. The girls in the back are the youngest sisters of Alonzo: Grace (1887-1945) and Etta (1885-1939). The girls lived in Bureau County, Illinois.

My comment: Paul looks very much like his two sons, Leo and Edward, did when they were that age; as well as others of his descendants, even me, a little bit.  ;-)


Families are Forever! ;-)

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 14 - April 2-9, 1937


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 14 - April 2-9, 1937


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 14 (Apr 2-9): I am still thinking about the Big Group Music Contest that Eileen went to in Corning, a couple of hours away, on Friday. She got off work. This is the Spring of 1937, a year after she graduated. It was obviously very important to her. She went with me a couple of times when I was in High School in the 1950s. I guess it continued!

In looking for a photo for today's post, look what I found. This is a clipping from the 2003 Coon Rapids Enterprise, with a photo of the Coon Rapids High School Glee Club back in 1934… with some very familiar names (to me) - you may recognize others, as well.

Paul, Keith and Dale Textor; Richard Miller, Jack Rodgers, June Vaughn (a woman! pianist, I'll bet) Wallace Arms, Maurice Miller, Wesley Thomas, Andrew Raebuck, Roy Hilgenberg, Leo Kinnick, Charles Browning… wow! 
 


Comments welcomed! 

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, April 8, 2012

Sharing Memories - Easter, through the years


Sharing Memories - Easter, through the years






This is my 72nd Easter, as I stop and think about it. Certainly seeing myself in the 1940 US Census this week, along with my parents at age 24 and 21, brought this to mind, if nothing else did.

Here we are in 1954, my 14th Easter, with Mom and Dad and 2 of my 3 brothers (at the time). Next younger brother was taking the photo!


I recently created a webpage, on Squidoo.com, named: Easter and Eggs, through the years, for me. It has been quite popular on that site, Pinterest.com, and on Facebook. It has photos and comments of my kids and grandkids' Easters as they grew up, and are growing up. Many of the traditions have remained. Is that true for you, as well?

I hope you'll take this as an excuse to think back over your years, with your family and friends, to think how Easter celebrations have changed, and stayed the same, as the years have passed by.

It has been a while since I posted a photo of the cabin... just put out the Easter banners, and red flowers are blooming... What better time? We are still here. Our 12th year with the cabin in the family. Time marches on...  ;-)





Families are Forever!  ;-)


Saturday, April 7, 2012

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Genealogy Easter Egg Hunt


Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Genealogy Easter Egg Hunt

It is a please to participate, tonight, in a Randy Seaver 'Saturday Night Genealogy Fun' project!

With my other activities, it has been hard to spend much time on the 1940 Census images - it was a pleasure to follow this Hunt, to do some things I wanted to do anyway!

I already knew that I wanted to look in my home town of Coon Rapids, Iowa, which I had already determined (I was in 14-33) to be 14-32. Tonight, I went to Ancestry.com, click 1940, and entered 14-33 as the ED. It showed 40 pages. I opened a new folder and copied each of the 40 images into it, as I will be doing much more work on a variety of people in this town. After a bit of experimenting, I realized I wanted to downsize the images to a width of 1500 pixels, for future reference (I'll finish doing that, later).

My target family was my (only living at the time) grandparents. Although I had saved the images, I decided to quickly scan the images on live, backing up from 40… on 32, I found them near the bottom of the page. Paul (1892-1968) and Dorothy KINNICK (1887-1982) were there with their youngest son, Edward, 11, on 2nd Street.




I added the following to my "To Be Checked" list:

1. Their entry on 1935 residence said: Same house - I personally know this not to be true… so this will be interesting to check. At the very least, they were living on a farm outside town in 1936, 37. I wondered when they moved to town: By 1940!

2. I need to check the address. I also need to ask each of my two uncles, including Edward (Buzzy), who are still alive, about these homes. I was already reminded earlier I need to do that, but this reinforces and allows me to be more specify in my questions (good for we older folks!).

Thanks, Randy!


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, April 5, 2012

1940 US Census Update on Ancestry.com


1940 US Census Update on Ancestry.com


The following note was just in my email from Ancestry.com, about 8 pm CDT:

"Ancestry.com is proud to announce the first indexed states of the 1940 U.S. Census are now ready for searching. After 72 years being held from public view, the Nevada and Delaware 1940 Census is now available and searchable for free on Ancestry.com.  While the remainder of the U.S. states are digitized and available for viewing, Delaware and Nevada can now be easily searched by name, opening a window into the time of the great depression and WWII.  Information that can be found in this recently released census includes: name, address, value of home, occupation and employment status, income in 1939, education, marriage information and much more.

We are also in the final stage of uploading all 3.8 million images from the 1940 Census and that is slated to be completed by tomorrow morning (April 6). What’s more, to complement the launch of the 1940 Census, Ancestry.com is by providing free access to 1 billion hand-selected records from the 1940’s era through April 10.

For more information on the newly released 1940 U.S. Census, visit Ancestry.com/1940."

Progress. I'm not aware of any family in either state in 1940, but I'm going to go check it out, just to see how it feels. Perhaps you will as well! 


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - I'm in the 1940 census!


Wordless (nearly) Wednesday - I'm in the 1940 census!



Union Twp, Carroll County, Iowa - Leverne, 24, Eileen, 21. and William, son, age messed up.
Date of Census: May 1, 1940 - I would be become 1 year old on July 1, 1940.

Note that we lived nest to H.L., Kate and Ralph Preston. H.L. (Harry) was my Dad's mother's brother. We were at # 4 on this Mappy Monday post.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 13 - March 27-April 2, 1937

Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 13 - March 27-April 2, 1937


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school. During the latter half of 2011, commented weekly on these entries.
For 1937, I am transcribing the daily entries, currently, at The KINNICK Project surname blog.

In this weekly blog post, I will make summary comments and observations, and perhaps add a photo, from time to time. Starting here with Week 10, I am switching to the week ending on Friday.
Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; his girl friend, later wife, Ida, visited regularly. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy) was 9 years old. Pete Smith is her 'boy friend' - fourth month starting Jan 1 (they do marry, in Mar 1938).

Week 13 (Mar 27-Apr 2): On Wednesday, March 31, Eileen's Dad went to the school musical. This was good reminder that he was on the Board of Directors of the School District.

In the recent Coon Rapids Enterprise, Page 4, 75 Years Ago column for March 12, 1937, it read:

"C.E Coder was re-elected to the local school Monday by a margin of three voted receiving 145 to 142 cast for Orton Kretziner. Apparently neither candidate did any campaigning or the results might have been different. The board now is composed of Mr. Coder, elected for a three year term; H.S. Keister and L.A. Jordan, whose terms expire in 1938 and P.H. Kinnick and Chas. W. Thomas, whose terms expire in 1939."

Related to earlier stories in Eileen's diary, the next paragraph reads:

"Harry Cadden announced in this issue that his new clothing store will be open for business and that he expects to have all his stock in and be ready for his grand opening in another week. Carpenters and painters have completed their work of remodeling the interior of the store, stock is arriving daily and the new store promises to be a decided credit to the town."


Comments welcomed! 

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, April 2, 2012

Announcement of 1940 census image releases




Announcement of 1940 census image releases

The following press release has appeared in many place; if you missed it, here it is again, to remind you the process for seeing the 1940 census, and the continued need for volunteers!

1940 US Census Project Update

Get Ready, Get Set . . .

Thank you for your interest in the 1940 US Federal Census. This will be the last email you receive on behalf of the 1940 US Census Community Project before the images start to become available online.

What You Can Expect on April 2

The 1940 US Census Community Project is creating an index to the 1940 US Federal Census that will be made available for free. This is a joint effort between Archives, FindMyPast, FamilySearch, hundreds of societies, and tens of thousands of individual volunteers. The resulting index will be made available on the websites of the primary sponsors.
On the morning of Monday, April 2, NARA will release the digital images of the 1940 census to multiple parties, including the 1940 US Census Community Project. We will immediately start uploading these 3.6 million images to servers, where they will become available online over time. The ability for people to start accessing some of these images through the community project will take hours, not minutes.
As the first five states are loaded to servers, corresponding projects will be set up to index those images as state projects. We anticipate the first five states will be available for volunteer indexing by 10pm EDT.
The first five states to be loaded and ready for indexing on April 2 are the following:
  • Delaware
  • Virginia
  • Kansas
  • Oregon
  • Colorado
The process of uploading images and setting up indexing projects by state will continue until all of the states and territories for this project are published, which may take up to two weeks to complete. Every day more images will be made available for browsing and indexing, so you will want to check back often to see which states are available.
The indexing process will be taking place through FamilySearch indexing. If you are already a FamilySearch indexing volunteer, these 1940 census projects will appear as new projects in the indexing software. No new software download or registration process is necessary to participate. If you are not currently a volunteer but want to participate in this historic opportunity, get started by downloading the indexing software and registering today.
What You Can Do Now

  1. Download and install the indexing software
    Watch an Overview | Get Started
  2. Learn how to index the 1940 US Census
    Watch a Video | Try the 1940 Census indexing simulation
  3. Let others know about the 1940 US Census Community Project
    Like the Facebook page | Follow @The1940Census on Twitter | Follow the page on Google+ | Tell friends about the1940census.com
You can keep up with the latest updates by visiting the1940census.com often over the next few weeks.


Thank You!
The 1940 US Census Community Project Team
 
 
Families are Forever!  ;-)