You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Friday, September 30, 2011

Follow Friday - 30 Sep 2011


Follow Friday
30 Sep 2011


From time to time we benefit from reminders of things that are 'right in front of our face' - I'll put this recommendation in that category. Thanks to Randy Seaver for bringing it to my attention this week.

Carolyn L. Barkely in her GenealogyandFamilyHistory.com wrote: "Genealogy Columns in Newspapers: Important Resources of Your Research."

Not only does she provide a number of excellent examples and sources, but, she also reminds each of us, who write regularly, that we should consider writing such a column, ourselves, for our local or home-town paper.

Again, excellent reminders! Thank you, Carolyn (and Randy!).


What do you think? Have you looked at these sources? Might you consider writing such a column? Do you? 

Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Those Places Thursday - Willow#3 School, Greene County, Iowa


Those Places Thursday
Willow#3 School, Greene County, Iowa


Recently, I shared a "Those Places Thursday - Star Church 1955" that was a social center of the community where my wife and I grew up in the 1940s and 1950s in west central Iowa. Today, I continue this series by sharing photos including the one-room country school that I attended for Kindergarten through seventh grade: Willow #3 in Greene County, Willow Township, Iowa. This school was located two miles directly east, across the county line, from the Star Church.

Iowa one-room country schools were originally located on the center corner of every four square miles. The Iowa I grew up in consisted of a very homogeneous checkerboard of regular roads every mile, both north and south and east and west. Only rivers, lakes and such natural barriers prevents a road every mile. Interesting, looking back; and fairly distinctive, it now seems. [Our farm house was also on a corner, one mile directly south of the Willow #3 school house.]

A few years ago, I created a web page in my The Early Years series on Willow #3. Today, I will add another photo taken at the school. I'm at the far right, with suspenders.



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - 5 KINNICK Siblings


Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday
5 KINNICK Siblings





Left to right (dates late 1940s):

Robert (1896-1953)
Gertrude (1902-1988) {Brideson}
Lillian (1908-1993) {Ford}
Lucile (1894-1956) {Herron}
Paul (1892-1968) - my maternal grandfather

Families are Forever!  ;-)



Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 38 - Sep 14-20


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 38 - Sep 14-20


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo.

Week 38. 1936 was a year of extreme weather, much like 2011; see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1936_North_American_heat_wave
http://www.courierpress.com/news/2010/jan/11/steve-austin-column-1936-37-set-standard-weather-e/

I was fascinated to hear Eileen talk of "First time I ever saw all of our land" and "make the cows swim" in the river on the property. This was the Middle Raccoon River that was a pretty powerful stream when flooded. I can visualize it very well… scary - I do not like flood waters, anywhere.

"Watched Mts. Pitch horse shoes." A family by the surname of Mountain lived on the edge of town. She went past their home on about every trip to town. Two of the 'young ladies' in the family became school teachers in Coon Rapids, for many years, into the1980s-90s. Fixtures in the community.
From 1930 U.S. Census:
Daughter, Maud Mountain, Social Security Death Index:
Name: Maude M. Mountain
SSN: xxxxxxxxxxxx
Last Residence: 50058  Coon Rapids, Carroll, Iowa, United States of America
Born: 24 Oct 1902
Died: 21 Feb 1998

"Lund 's, Pete, Don A., Peverstorf's Par [ink blot blocked part of word] Jensen & I in truck riding in pm." There is Pete, again...  ;-)

Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)

Monday, September 26, 2011

It's Monday, What are You Reading? "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins

It's Monday, What are You Reading?
"The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins


This is the twenty-fifth entry for this meme, the fourth at this blog site, suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [The first 21 entries in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill's Book Bazaar, which has generally been on hiatus]

Ok, if you are a regular reader, you are probably beginning to question my sanity in choice of books to read… Correct, unless you understand my variety of interests and activities. It was a concern I had in combining the two blogs; but, here goes.

The Hunger Games, the first of three, so far, in this series by Suzanne Collins, is a Young Adult book that is now being made into a movie with a March 23, 2012 planned release (it is currently in post-production) starring Jennifer Lawrence.


As an Examiner.com writer, I have written about here extensively. [Jennifer Lawrence was the star of "Winter's Bone" - a story set in Ozarks, filmed in the county where I live. "Winter's Bone" was based on the book of the same name and won the Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic Film as the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. It was selected for four 2011 Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Actress (Jennifer) and Best Supporting Actor.]

As a highly acclaimed current Young Adult book series, I also have an interest beyond Jennifer Lawrence starring in the movie (and all three of my grown daughters anxiously looking forward to the movie based on reading the books…). In my author role, I have 'identified' a 14-year old  Civil War era young man in the family history of my current novel series. He cries out for a Young Adult novel, perhaps Graphic Novel, set 150 years ago in 2013. The Hunger Games is research for me in possibly writing this novel, in collaboration with my oldest daughter, who has developed some expertise in graphic novels. Ok, enough, for now. Wish me luck!  ;-)

 About the book - From School Library Journal; at Amazon.com:
Grade 7 Up - In a not-too-distant future, the United States of America has collapsed, weakened by drought, fire, famine, and war, to be replaced by Panem, a country divided into the Capitol and 12 districts. Each year, two young representatives from each district are selected by lottery to participate in The Hunger Games. Part entertainment, part brutal intimidation of the subjugated districts, the televised games are broadcasted throughout Panem as the 24 participants are forced to eliminate their competitors, literally, with all citizens required to watch. When 16-year-old Katniss's young sister, Prim, is selected as the mining district's female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart, Peeta, the son of the town baker who seems to have all the fighting skills of a lump of bread dough, will be pitted against bigger, stronger representatives who have trained for this their whole lives. Collins's characters are completely realistic and sympathetic as they form alliances and friendships in the face of overwhelming odds; the plot is tense, dramatic, and engrossing. This book will definitely resonate with the generation raised on reality shows like 'Survivor' and 'American Gladiator.' Book one of a planned trilogy.Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage Public Library, AK {Based on Hardcover edition} [I'm reading the Kindle Edition.]

By the way, it is still ok to question my sanity!  ;-)


Happy Reading,

Bill  ;-)

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Sunday's Obituary - Howard Rex Nielsen


Sunday's Obituary
Howard Rex Nielsen


[Howard's mother, Louise, was a sister of my grandmother, Dorothy (Sorensen) Kinnick. Dr. Bill]

Howard Rex, son of Rasmus L. and Louise M. (Sorensen) Nielsen, was born April 21, 1922 at Coon Rapids, Iowa. He attended rural school near his home and then went to school in Bayard, graduating with the Class of 1941. After completing his education, Howard worked on the farm with his dad until enlisting in the United States Army in 1942.



On April 5, 1948, Howard was united in marriage with Dorothy 'Dotty' White at the Fitzsimmons Hospital Chapel, Aurora, Colorado, where his wife was stationed. Howard had reenlisted in the Army and the couple lived in numerous countries while Howard served in the Army of Occupation in Japan and Korea. He was also stationed in Germany. After returning to the states, Howard was stationed in El Paso, TX. Then in February of 1963 after 20 years and one month he retired from the Army. The couple moved to Bellevue, NE. In mid-1963, Howard joined the federal civil service at Ft. McCoy, WI. After a short time there he was transferred to Offutt Air Force Base in Bellevue in administrative duties. He retired from the civil service in 1984 and they remained in Bellevue until moving to Carroll, IA in November of 2004.
After traveling much of their lives with the U. S. Army, Howard and Dotty enjoyed their home and caring for their poodles, as well as visiting family and the farm of his youth near Bayard. Howard loved to dance throughout his life. He also enjoyed fishing and feeding squirrels near his home.
Dotty died in 2005 and Howard continued to live in Carroll until his health began to fail and he became a resident of the Thomas Rest Haven in Coon Rapids. Shortly before his death, Howard had been admitted to the St Anthony Hospital in Carroll where he died on Wednesday, December 23, 2009, at the age of 87 years, 8 months and 2 days. Preceding Howard in death are his parents; wife and two brothers Paul Nielsen and Karl Nielsen and wife Mary Jo.
He is survived by his brother Darrell Nielsen and wife Marjorie of Glidden; four sisters: Winona and husband Ralph Huffman of Audubon; Annie and husband Jerry Vincent of Jefferson; Marie Nielsen of Audubon and Judy and husband Dave Marques of Livermore, CO; sister-in-law Helen Nielsen of Coon Rapids; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.

Families are Forever! ;-)

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Sports Center Saturday - Buzzy in 1941


Sports Center Saturday
Buzzy in 1941



'Buzzy' Kinnick is number 8, second from the right, back row, in the above photo. He is the younger brother of my mother, Eileen (Kinnick) Smith (see her 75 years ago Diary entries) posted on Tuesdays. His name is actually Edward.  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, September 23, 2011

Follow Friday - 23 Sep 2011


Follow Friday
23 Sep 2011


Sooner or later, most of us have or will face the situation discussed here by the Family Curator. Along with some other good references, she offers some very useful suggestions to get you started on your task.

http://www.thefamilycurator.com/home/2011/9/9/short-list-what-to-watch-for-in-a-family-archive.html

What do you think? Have you had this experience?  Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Treasure Chest Thursday - Kaylee approaches four


Treasure Chest Thursday
Kaylee approaches four



My wife, Nancy, and I are visiting our grandchildren in Austin, TX, this week while our daughter, their mother, Arrion, attends business meetings in New York City for a few days. Dad, Ben, is working during the day, of course, so we are here to pick up (and drop off) the kids from school and 'take care of them' as needed. That is what grandparents do, and we enjoy it very much.

Last night, playing with Kaylee, coming up on four years old, we noticed this framed, hand-embroidered piece Nancy had done when Kaylee was born. It will carry down through her family as a keepsake, even though it is now only four years old. It was created with much love in anticipation of her arrival, and now occupies a prime piece of real estate on top of her dresser.  I thought I'd take this occasion to celebrate it, as we live our family histories, together! 

Families are Forever!  ;-)


Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - Pete and Eileen


Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday
Pete and Eileen



This is an undated image of my parents, Pete and Eileen (Kinnick) Smith, around the time they got married - before I arrived, I'm sure...  ;-) They seem terribly happy!  ;-)

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 37 - Sep 7-13


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 37 - Sep 7-13


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo.

Week 37. "Got Carl Scott to shock for us." "Riling binding our oats" These are each hiring neighbors to perform harvesting crops on the farm. Eileen's Dad is a banker, not a farmer. Leo did some basic work, rest done as 'custom work.'

On Wednesday, we see to common weekly events - Eileen studying her shorthand, listening to Lucky Strike Hour on the radio.

Here, we also get to see an image of the actual diary entries. Fun!  ;-)

Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)

Monday, September 19, 2011

Recognition in Australia


Recognition in Australia


How neat to be recognized in Australia! Thank you!



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Two Year Blogiversary!


Two Year Blogiversary!

Initial Post - September 19, 2009

Mappy Monday - Concord Twp, Bureau Co, IL-1867


Mappy Monday
Concord Twp, Bureau Co, IL
1867


This is my first Mappy Monday, using maps from my family history and genealogy research to tell the stories of my ancestors - that is, after all, what this blog is supposed to be all about - right?  ;-)





I received this from a volunteer research person with the Bureau County, IL, Genealogy Society, in Princeton, IL, in 1995, when I started seriously researching my mother's paternal line, KINNICK. If you look carefully, you can see the "Kinnick" name, second row from the top, fifth square from the right, just above the 'swamp.' Those marking are most interesting. I did this image back in the day when 'space' was at a premium on the computer. Today, I would be able to blow this up to full screen. Sorry. Perhaps on a future Mappy Monday I'll do that. For today, we are just getting started.

This land had an interesting story. I'll just share a bit, then expand later. Walter KINNICK, my 3rd Great-Grandfather, bought 160 acres here, but died, far too young, in 1853, without ever getting to live here. His wife, Susan, and his several children, eventually lived here. However, ownership was split because he died intestate, and under Illinois law, his assets were distributed to the children and the wife, not just to her. There were some court records to satisfy various claims to finally establish who owned which pieces of the 'already not very large' farm. A details story for another time.

Do you like to have maps like these as much as I do?


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, September 18, 2011

My Memories Suite Giveway Winner and More


Betty was the winner of our Giveaway of the My Memories Suite Software. Congratulations!

However, you can still use coupon code STMMMS57096 to receive a $10 discount off the purchase for the My Memories Suite Software and a $10 coupon for the MyMemories.com store - a $20 value. Check it out, RIGHT NOW. You will be glad you did!  ;-)

[Disclosure: I earn a small commission, should you choose to use the coupon code on a purchase.]

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Sport Center Saturday - High School Basketball


Sport Center Saturday
High School Basketball





I am trying to "spread my wings" by using an increasing variety of 'daily theme memes' on this blog - this is the first of this category - Sport Center Saturday. Excuse my using myself, to start, but I came across this photo, and it reminded me to start this meme....  This is at Coon Rapids, Iowa, High School, 1956-57, my senior year, I think, photo day in the gym... This is my white uniform, there is a black one, as well. I was not a starter, but I enjoyed it. Basketball was my best participation sport, even though it wasn't, relatively, all that great. Gets me started though. 

I have photos to share of my father, a grandfather and an uncle, I think, playing football. At least one uncle playing basketball... so, I'll try to locate those and begin to fill out this new meme, as I add others. Fun. Have you tried adding different memes to your blog?


Families are Forever!  ;-)


Friday, September 16, 2011

Follow Friday - 16 Sep 2011


Follow Friday
16 Sep 2011


"How Your Ancestor's Occupation Can Help Your Genealogy Research" by Valarie at her "Begin with 'Craft'" blog provides insight into a resource you may not have considered before.


What do you think? Have you had this experience?  Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Those Places Thursday - Star Church 1955


Those Places Thursday
Star Church 1955



This photo would have been taken between my sophmore and junior year in high school. This is the rural Methodist Church that was the focal point of our rural community. The left hand side of the building was the original church, see below. The right side was originally the Star School building that had been located across the road to the far left, above. It was moved, a new basement was built, the school building "set on top" and it became a "Community Hall" - very nice, for the times.

The Bolger family, my wife's family, lived a mile to the north of this intersection, and a half mile west. She attended the school from kindergarten through seventh grade, then went to Coon Rapids Consolidated School. My family (Smith) lived a mile south and two miles to the east, across the county line in Greene County. I went to Coon Rapids school starting in the eighth grade. After we graduated from high school, a few years, this church closed and the members all went to Coon Rapids for church, as well.

For comparison, this is the original church, a few years earlier.


This physical location is a few miles north of Coon Rapid, Carroll County, Iowa.

Note: The Carrollton School and Store I wrote about a few weeks ago, was located just a few miles directly west of this location.  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - Star Progressive Club 1947


Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday
Star Progressive Club 1947



Eileen, my Mom, at far right


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 36 - Aug 31-Sep 6


Eileen KINNICK
75 yrs ago
Week 36 - Aug 31-Sep 6


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo.

Week 36. I'll focus my comments today on three items. First, I really enjoyed being able to research and get a good feeling for the kind of books Mom read. And she did read a lot; regular visits to the library. Second, I was able here to provide a photo of a close friend, Paul Textor. He was in Leo and Ida's class - this photo came from their class photo, where Ida had written the names of the students. Paul became a Methodist minister. I knew him well as I was growing up. He spent a number of years in a neighboring town when I was high school age. Third, "Dad went to school board meeting." In 2005, when I transcribed this, I assumed he was Board Treasurer [which he was for many years]. Earlier this year, however, I read the Coon Rapids Enterprise article that said he was actually elected to the Board as a Director in March 1936. He was on the board when she graduated - just like my Dad was on the School Board when I graduated, in 1957. Small world! Bonus comment: She was excited to listen, on the radio, to the 1936 Colleg All-Stars football game against the reigning professional football Champions, Detroit Lions. Guess I come by my love of watching/listening to football games naturally. [I'm watching Iowa-Iowa State football game on television as I type this!]


Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)

Monday, September 12, 2011

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Unfinished Presidency - Brinkley


It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
The Unfinished Presidency - Brinkley


This is the twenty-fourth entry for this meme, the third at this blog site, suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [The first 21 entries in the series were posted at the Dr. Bill's Book Bazaar, which has generally been on hiatus]

Last week, I wrote here: As I finished White House Diary by Jimmy Carter I realized that there were Ronald Reagan Diaries that picked up the story by the next president, continuing events from a different perspective. Especially when I realized there was a book edited by historian Douglas Brinkley that was available in a Kindle Edition - it had to be read next.

Well, in looking at the other books that Douglas Brinkley had written, I came across a 1998 book, entitled "The Unfinished Presidency: Jimmy Carter's Journey Beyond the White House." He had set about to do a 3-volume biography on Carter, but discovered there was a more interesting story begging to be written; which he did. I was able to find a hard cover copy in good condition of this 13 year old book on Amazon for $6. Hard to pass up. So, I am now reading it along with the Reagan diaries on Kindle, in tandem…  ;-)


Amazon.com Review:
Jimmy Carter isn't the first American president to become more popular after leaving the Oval Office than when he served in it; even Richard Nixon managed a semi-rehabilitation in the post-Watergate years. Yet perhaps no ex-president has reversed his fortunes so completely as Carter, whose approval rating has done nothing but improve since he lost his 1980 reelection bid. Many Americans admire Carter for his work building homes in the United States with the group Habitat for Humanity, but the 39th president is known and respected throughout the world for attempting to negotiate peace in trouble spots such as Haiti, North Korea, and the Middle East. "Carter," writes Douglas Brinkley, "has become a true citizen of the world." Noteworthy sections of this unauthorized biography (which benefits from lengthy interviews with its subject) include the story of how Carter worked relentlessly to undermine President Bush in the days leading up to the Persian Gulf War, as well as Carter's difficult relations with President Clinton. Also, Brinkley appreciates, and treats seriously, Carter's religious faith in a way many previous analysts have not. An excellent portrait of a complicated man. --John J. Miller



Happy Reading,

Bill  ;-)

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Civil War Series on Sunday - Walter Kinnick - 2 Affidavits


Civil War Series on Sunday
Walter Kinnick
2 Affidavits

Each of us who have worked with Civil War Pension files are familiar with the incredible amount of paper work our ancestors were required to complete in order to qualify for their pensions - even many years after the war (hoops to jump through, some would contend) - and, to be fair, sometimes it
was because they had made a mistake... which is the case here.

Today I am sharing a set of affidavits from the Pension file of my 2nd great-grandfather, Walter W. Kinnick, when he apparently omitted an enlistment in Co. D, 7th Kansas Cavalry from his list of service. He was required, it appears, to have another person who served with him also submit an accompanying affidavit; that was William C. Warren, who appeared with him and said he knew/recognized him.




Walter's affidavit declaration reads:
He is the pensioneer (sic) Certificate #981.073, That he served in Co. I . 12 th. Illinois. and enlisted in that Co. April 22 nd. 1861. and was mustered in the Company. May 2 nd. 1861 and was mustered out August 2 nd. 1861. and Then in the Year 1862 August 14 th. he enlisted in Co. D. 7 th. Kansas Cav. That he makes this affidavit for the purpose establishing this enlistment which was omitted in my application for pension. That my Birth day is Eleventh day of Ocotober 1840.
/s/ Walter W. Kinnick
28th day of December 1915 Notary Public /s/ Edward Myers

Personal note: Neat to see his signature - and, good confirmation of his birth date.




 William's affidavit declaration reads:
He is 72 years of age That he served in the late rebellion Co. I. Twelfth Illinois Inft. That I am well acquainted with Comrade Walter W. Kinnick who served with me in Co. I. Twelfth Illinois. and we enlisted April 22 nd. 1861. and was mustered in May 2 nd. 1861 and mustered out August 2nd. 1861. Then in August 14 th. 1862 the records show he inlisted (sic) in Co. D. 7 Kansas Cavelry (sic). I make this affidavit in the presence of said comrade Walter W. Kinnick and recognize him to be the same person that inlisted (sic) with me.
/s/ William C. Warren
28th day of December 1915 Notary Public /s/ Edward Myers

Here is a photo of Walter W. Kinnick, seated, with his son, Alonzo, and grandson, Paul, about the time these affidavits were completed.




Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Surname Saturday - Surnames through 3rd GGparents


Surname Saturday
Surnames through 3rd GGparents


Good time for a review of surnames. 

From page two of my (this) Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories blog (link upper left sidebar), these are my family names, thru 3rd GGparents, plus a few:

Butler, Carle, Christensen*,  Duncan, Fad, Kinnick/Kennick, Krag, Miller, Mortensdatter,  Nielsen*, Preston, Rolen/Rolin, Simmons, Smith/Schmitt, Soderstrom, Sorensen, Williams

*Same line - Danish naming convention explains difference.

Additional lines researched, further back:

Firestone, Jones, Kimmerling, Kirk, Lee, Schwyhart, Vesterstrom

[I didn't put in links, but you can scroll down to my labels, find the surname, and click to get all posts - in theory, at least - with that surname.]


Families are Forever! ;-)

Friday, September 9, 2011

Follow Friday - 9 Sep 2011


Follow Friday
9 Sep 2011

"The Situation of Family & Genealogy" by Caroline Pointer is well worth the read, for most of us, if you haven't read it already. Thanks to Randy Seaver for bringing it to my attention. Also, be sure you get to the bottom of Caroline's post, and click on the link to the 1000memories.com blog - it will be worth your effort.  ;-)


What do you think? Have you had this experience?  Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Treasure Chest Thursday - My Memories Suite Giveaway


Treasure Chest Thursday
My Memories Suite Giveaway


I used to do giveaways regularly on my Book Blog but this is the first since the two blogs have been combined. You are free to ignore it, of course, but I think some of my readers might be interested in this digital scrapbooking software called my memories suite that you can use to help organize and present the memories of your family now stored away in shoeboxes of photos. I am always urging you to tell your ancestor/family stories, so this is just one more way.



This scrapbook software is easy to use; whether you use the scrapbook templates or you use your own creative ideas. Below I have provided an example (poor, I suppose, but it is a sample) that I did in a little over an hour, including moving the photos to a separate folder, selecting the template, putting it together, and converting (in this case) to a set of jpgs to share here.

Before I forget, since this is both a review and a promotional blog post, if you should decide to order the digital scrapbooking software on your own - not wait to see if you win the giveaway, use coupon code STMMMS57096 to receive a $10 discount off the purchase for the My Memories Suite Software and a $10 coupon for the MyMemories.com store - a $20 value. [Disclosue: I get a small commission]

For more information, you may want to view the excellent videos at:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MyMemoriesSuite.

Giveaway Information
Win a free copy of the My Memories Suite Version 2.0 digital scrapbooking software

1. Go to the www.MyMemories.com website and choose a favorite digital paper pack or layout.
2. Leave a comment on this Blog Post, with your choice and why you like it.
3. You must include your email address (you can add spaces or say "at" rather than @ to control spam) in the comment to be eligible.
4. Your comment must be posted by 10 am on Thursday, September 15.

Good luck to each interested Giveaway participant. The winner will be determined from qualifying entries via Random.org List Randomizer.

Here is my 5 page sample output from the digital scrapbook software:





Finally, to learn more about My Memories, they invite you to follow:

Blog- http://blog.mymemories.com/
Facebook- http://www.facebook.com/pages/MyMemories/140359372717593
Twitter- http://twitter.com/#!/mymemoriessuite

[Disclosure: I received a a free copy of the software to do this review and to promote this giveaway; the free giveaway software for the winner was also provided by My Memories.com]

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Wordless (Nearlly) Wednesday - Easter 1954


Wordless (Nearlly) Wednesday
Easter 1954



Bill holding Barry, Eileen, Pete and Tom
[thanks to brother Jim for taking photo!]
'New porch' and visored Chevy - lots of memories


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 35


Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago
Week 35 - Aug 24-30


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo.

Week 35. Maybe a little too much detail, sometimes, about the "Mash Unit" - all three young folks ill or recovering this week. Edith Lund was good friend of Eileen who lived down the road; often stopped by and helped with housework - very nice. She was a life-long friend; nice lady!

Notes - We see our first book reference, as well as reference to car and cornet. Nice to see her feeling well enough again to be thinking about going to 'college' in a town where her aunt lived. Didn't happen, but she was thinking about it. Her dad would have still needed to pay tuition, and got the impression that was not something he wanted to do. ;-(


Reference to '...went down to Rasmuses' ... that is Paul Nielsen's parents; Paul's mother was Eileen's aunt - sister to mom's mom. They lived on a farm to the southeast of Coon Rapids, perhaps ten or so miles away. I think they may not have had a car. [Their place always reminded me of 'Ma and Pa Kettle' when we visited when I was a youngster!]

Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)

Monday, September 5, 2011

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Reagan Diaries - Brinkley


It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
The Reagan Diaries
Abridged and Edited by Douglas Brinkley


This is the twenty-third entry for this meme, suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [The first 21 entries in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill's Book Bazaar, which has now been put on hiatus]


As I finished White House Diary by Jimmy Carter I realized that there were Ronald Reagan Diaries that picked up the story by the next president, continuing events from a different perspective. Especially when I realized there was a book edited by historian Douglas Brinkley that was available in a Kindle Edition - it had to be read next.


From Publishers Weekly - on Amazon.com:

The diaries our 40th president kept while in office—edited and abridged by historian Brinkley (The Great Deluge)—are largely a straightforward political chronicle. Reagan describes meetings with heads of state and antiabortion leaders, reflects on legislative strategy and worries about leaks to the press. He often used his diary to vigorously defend his polices: for example, after a 1984 visit with South African archbishop Desmond Tutu (whom Reagan calls "na├»ve"), the president explained why his approach to apartheid—"quiet diplomacy"—was preferable to sanctions. Reagan sometimes seems uncomfortable with dissent, as when he is irked by a high school student who presents a petition advocating a nuclear freeze. And he often sees the media as a "lynch mob," trying to drum up scandal where there is none. Reagan's geniality shines through in his more quotidian comments: he muses regularly about how much he appreciates Nancy, and his complaints about hating Monday mornings make him seem quite like everyone else. Brinkley doesn't weigh down the text with extensive annotation; this makes for smooth reading, but those who don't remember the major political events of the 1980s will want to refer to the glossary of names. Reagan's diaries are revealing, and Brinkley has done historians and the broad public a great service by editing them for publication. (May 22)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.



Happy Reading,

Bill  ;-)

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Sentimental Sunday - Nielsen home in Denmark


Sentimental Sunday
Nielsen home in Denmark


From our cousins, Orla and Bente Poulsen, in Denmark, we have now received this photo of home of my great-grandmother, Jensine (Nielsen) Sorensen (b. 1852). She, and each of her siblings, were born in this home. This photo from about 1950, I am told. The original photo from Anders Nielsen, son of Jensine's brother, Morten (b. 1848). Anders is grandfather of Orla Pousen.


The area of the farm in Hvorup parish was known as Hvorup Mill. The Mill itself was on the other side of the street on a hill top. Morten Nielsen (d. there 1931) needed the wind to power the mill. Later came electricity. The mill is no longer there. Today, the Mill area and the fields as well are a part of a big military area, per their note.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Surname Saturday - KRAG married SORENSEN


Surname Saturday
KRAG married SORENSEN


As first reported recently in this July 31 Sentimental Sunday post and following a series of discussion with our new found cousins in Denmark, we now have the names of both the parents of my mother's maternal grandparents, Lauritz and Jensene (NIELSEN) SORENSEN, including maiden names in each case. Over the past two weeks, we talked of her parents, Niels CHRISTENSEN and Maren Kristine MORTENSDATTER (as well as learning about Danish naming patterns).

Today, we will share the brief information obtained on Lauritz's parents: Anders Christian SORENSEN and his wife, Dorthea KRAG.

It is first interesting to note that neither of these families followed the Danish naming conventions. The father of my great-grandfather Lauritz Christian SORENSEN was Anders Christian SORENSEN (b. act 1807, Aalborg, Denmark; d. 14 Jun 1886, Vor Frue parish, Aalborg, Denmark).

Lauritz's mother was Dorthea KRAG (b. act 1808, Aalborg, Denmark; d. unknown)

Anders and Dorthea were married 8 Apr 1831, Sonder Tranders parish, Aalborg, Denmark - the 'family' story has it that he was a widower at his death. He was a small farmer in Aalborg, Osterbro 12. [Aalborg is sometime spelled with one A and sometimes Aa - I will generally use Aa in my writing. Osterbro 12 is a location address.]

They had two children (that we know of, so far):

1. Anne Dorthea, b. 3 Jun 1834, Vor Frue parish, Aalborg, Denmark; d. unknown
2. Lauritz Christian, b. 9 Apr 1847, Aalborg, Denmark; d. 15 Aug 1922, Coon Rapids, Carroll Co, Iowa (my hometown!)

One more note: Dorthea KRAG - a daughter, Anne Dorthea - Lauritz named his first daughter, my grandmother, Dorthea Kristine…  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, September 2, 2011

Follow Friday - 2 Sep 2011


Follow Friday
2 Sep 2011


I spent many years (1976-1994, and some on to 2009) working with people on their accounting and tax issues as well as general business practices as they converted their hobbies and personal interests into careers and small businesses (many tried, a few were successful). Therefore, a post that speaks to these issues, especially when they are well written and documented, always get my attention.

"Turning your genealogy hobby into a career" is a excellent post on this subject, based on the 4 questions from Rebecca Thebault (reference in the post) for general application.

As usual, Michael 'tells it like it is' based on his personal experience as well as a disciplined analysis. My thirty plus years experience as an advisor in the area confirms what is written in this post. Be sure to read the comments, of course, as well.


What do you think? Have you made the transition? Are you considering it? Do you agree or disagree with this presentation?  Comments welcomed.

P.S. Let's do two this week:

To good to pass up up: "All I Really Need to Know about Genealogy I learned in Kindergarten." Thanks, again, Elizabeth!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Treasure Chest Thursday - Joseph KINNICK Pension File


Treasure Chest Thursday
Joseph KINNICK Pension File


In my Civil War Series on Sunday a week or so ago, I reported on the enlistment of my great-great uncle, Joseph KINNICK, in the Civil War on 18 Aug 1861. His story is extensively documented in his Pension File, as well as in other records. Today, however, I want to recognize that Pension File as a Treasure Chest item. I will only include a scan of one of the documents here, but the entire file is 'the treasure' - a 'treasure trove' of information including the information on his military service, the affidavits of neighbors over many years to earn the pension, the record of increasing pension amounts over the years, and the widow's pension that followed for a few years. Seeing the notification of death of both Joseph, and his wife, Rachel, is also a treasure. I'm sure I will post other scans, certainly transcriptions, that continue the story of his nearly five years of service, 150 years ago, in the service of his country.

[Click to see larger image]




Families are Forever!  ;-)