You may also like to read:

If you enjoy reading this blog, you may also like to read the articles I write each week as the Springfield Genealogy Examiner and as the Ozarks Cultural Heritage Examiner. Be sure to subscribe so you don't miss a one. You may also enjoy reading about the family stories in my novels at The Homeplace Series blog. You can sign up for e-mail reminders.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - 52 Weeks - Week 35 Wedding


Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday &
52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History
Week 35 - Wedding

Thanks to GeneaBloggers and Amy Coffin of the We Tree blog for these prompts.

Week 35: Weddings. Tell us about your wedding. ...in pictures...







Bride, Nancy, with little sister, Janice, and Grandma Hazel



"Going away"  ;-)




Families are Forever!  ;-)


Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 34


Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago
Week 34 - Aug 17-23


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo.

Week 34. 'Appendicitis' seemed to be the malady of the month - She was looking after her older brother, Leo, who had the operation at end of last week. On Thursday, this week, her Dad brought their cousin (her mom's son), Paul Nielsen, to be operated on and took Leo home. On Friday, it appears Mom (Eileen) had a ruptured appendix!

Note on Birthdays - Mom's Dad, my grandfather, Paul Kinnick, was not much for celebrating either birthdays or Christmas or such… amazing. Big deal for the rest of the family, but not him. [Scrooge?]

The link should work as: http://stoopnagle.com/ - but I can't get it to work, either.

Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)

Monday, August 29, 2011

Motivation Monday - 500th post on Tuesday - already scheduled


Motivation Monday
500th post on Tuesday
already scheduled

The 'Week 34 - 75 years ago - of the Eileen KINNICK Diary' post is already scheduled as the Tuesday post this week (tomorrow); it will be the 500th post on this Blog, which had an Initial Post on Saturday, 19 Sep 2009. [My first blog, 2005-2009, stands as 482, mostly retired...]

That first post (too long, as most early blog posts tend to be, I have noticed) shared a report and a letter from 1995, when my wife and I really got serious about our family history and genealogy adventure. The 'report to our daughters' was titled:

Farmers of the Prairie; the people, the times, the places
A story of one family; created from many families

and was followed by a copy of the transmittal letter to our three daughters. I do make note that a lot of changes will be made as the research continued. I really had no way of knowing how true that would really be.

By the way, posts 501 and 502 are already posted for a few days hence… moving toward 1000 and beyond.


Families are, indeed, Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, August 28, 2011

Civil War Series on Sunday - Union General joins Confederacy


Civil War Series on Sunday
Union General joins Confederacy


In Apr 2010, I shared the story of my fourth cousin, twice removed, Albert Sydney Johnston, in some detail. As we approach the first of September, 2011, it is worth remembering what was going on 150 years ago this week. After the Mexican-American War, Johnston returned to his Texas plantation until President Taylor re-appointed him to the U.S. Army to establish a non-Mormon government in the formerly Mormon territory. He was promoted to brevet brigadier general in 1857 for his service in Utah. He spent 1860 in Kentucky until December 21 when he sailed for California to take command of the Department of the Pacific.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was approached to take his Union forces east. However, when he heard of the secession of Texas, he resigned his commission on 9 April 1861; it was accepted by the War Department on 6 May 1861. He managed to work his way east*, reaching Richmond, Virginia, about the first of September, 1861. There Johnston was appointed a full general by his friend, Jefferson Davis. He became the second highest ranking Confederate general as commander of the Western Department.

He "lives in infamy" of course, dying at the Battle of Shiloh, the highest ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war. Jefferson Davis believed the loss of Johnston "was the turning point of our fate."


*On April 28 he moved to Los Angeles where he had family and remained where until May when, suspected by local Union authorities, he evaded arrest and joined the Los Angeles Mounted Rifles as a private, leaving Warner's Ranch May 27. He participated in their trek across the southwestern deserts to Texas, crossing the Colorado River in the Confederate Territory of Arizona on July 4, 1861.

[I noted there that much of the "information is based mostly on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Sidney_Johnston, paraphrased and edited for this presentation."]



Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Surname Saturday - MORTENSDATTER

Surname Saturday
MORTENSDATTER



My mother's mother's mother was Jensene Marie Nielsen, born in Denmark. As I reported in that Dec 2009 post, "This is my 'shortest line.'" That has now been modified, as first reported recently in this July 31 Sentimental Sunday post. Following a series of discussion with our new found cousins in Denmark, we now have the names of both the parents of Jensene and of her husband, Lauritz SORENSEN, including maiden names in each case. Last week we talked of her father, Niels CHRISTENSEN.

Today, we will share the brief information obtained on Jensene's mother, Maren Kristine MORTENSDATTER.

Last week we began our discussion of Scandinavian family name etymology. We noted that heritable family names (surnames) were generally adopted rather late within Scandinavia. In Denmark, the most common Danish family name surnames are patronymic and end in -sen. The other 'naming convention' they use is, per the cousins: "A child got its father's first name as its surname. Boys got -sen and girls got -datter (daughter)." Therefore, it would appear that Maren's father's first name was Morten!

Also, note Maren's middle name, Kristine. Her granddaughter by Jensene, my grandmother, had Christine as a middle name: Dorothy Christine. My wife and I gave it, Christine, as a middle name to our oldest daughter, Annette Christine. And, our youngest daughter, Arrion, gave it as a middle name to our only granddaughter, Kaylee Christine. She knew it came from four generations back. Now we know it goes six generations back.

Maren Kristine Mortensdatter. She was born 26 Jan 1823, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark and died 29 Mar 1915, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark.

She married Niels Christiensen, born 19 Sep 1817, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark, and died 24 Mar 1867, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark.

They had 7 children (with known information), each surname Nielsen, of course:

1. Christen, b. 19 Dec 1846; d. 10 Nov 1865
2. Morten, b. 9 Sep 1848; d. 3 Dec 1931 - ancestor of my cousin in Denmark
3. Karen, b. 4 Aug 1850; d. unk
4. Jensene Marie, b. 20 Aug 1852; d. 1906 - my g-grandmother
5. Rebekka, b. 3 Apr 1856; d. 2 Dec 18676
6. Caroline, b. 23 Nov 1858; d. unk
7. Else Marie, b. 23 Jan 1864; d. 1924


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, August 26, 2011

Follow Friday - 26 Aug 2011


Follow Friday
26 Aug 2011


This is a 'must read' for each serious genealogist, amateur or professional, if you have not seen it - or re-read it, even if you have - right?  ;-)

Michael Hait gives us easy to understand descriptions of these five key 'misused' words and phrases in genealogy - that we use every day:

1. "Research"
2. "Primary" and "Secondary"
3. "Evidence"
4. "Proof"
5. "Report"

Thanks, Michael!  ;-)

Source:
Michael Hait, “The 5 Most Misused Words and Phrases in Genealogy,” Planting the Seeds: Genealogy as a Profession blog, posted 19 Aug 2011 (http://michaelhait.wordpress.com : accessed 19 Aug 2011). http://michaelhait.wordpress.com/2011/08/19/5-misused-words/


What do you think? Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Those Places Thursday - Carrollton, Iowa


Those Places Thursday
Carrollton, Iowa



Store about 1920
The people are John Crow, his wife, Delia, and her mother, Mrs. Christopher


In Eileen's 1936 Diary entry in Week 32, she mentioned the school fire in Carrolton. I then posted the local newspaper accounts of that fire, as well. I wanted to follow up with this post about the town itself, focused on this GenWeb based article that is worth a second look.

Notice in the second part of the article, about the current active Carrollton Community Heritage Club, they mention that the "Carrollton schoolhouse is still intact" and go on to mention possible uses of the building to preserve the history of the area. This would be the building that was built after the 1936 fire, 75 years ago.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - Eileen and Pete


Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday

Eileen and Pete





In Eileen's 1936 diary, Week 33 (posted yesterday), we mentioned that on August 10, Pete Smith was first mentioned as a dancing partner. Here are Eileen and Pete, likely taken at a photo booth at the county fair, likely in later 1936 or in 1937. Of course, I knew them best as Mom and Dad!  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)


Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 33


Eileen KINNICK Diary - 75 yrs ago
Week 33 - Aug 10-16


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo. Lund family lived down the road, on the way to town.

Week 33. A theme you may have notices is she, and her friends, loved to dance. On Monday night, this week, she went dancing; this is ballroom dancing, big bands.   'Lunds' refers to the sisters, Erna and Edith. Note that their older brother, Elmer was among those there as well. AND, Pete Smith is mentioned. As story to follow, perhaps?!  ;-)
Note: Little Joe Hart and his Boys (1937)

Note on Friday, Leo finally had surgery. Peeking at next week it is clear he was taken to hospital in Carroll, about fifteen miles north of Coon Rapids.

Still time for music, movies and books; as well as dancing. Green link to Green Pastures: http://imdb.com/title/tt0027700/
Another side note: On Saturday, reference to 'Clara Bolger cafe' - my wife's aunt. ;-)

Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)


Monday, August 22, 2011

My Hometown on Monday - Carrollton School Fire


My Hometown on Monday
Carrollton School Fire


In Week 32 of Mom's diary - 75 years ago - she mentioned the fact that the Carrrollton school had caught fire and burned to the ground - about 15 miles north of where they lived.

Following are two stories from the Coon Rapids Enterprise, that appeared in the 11 and 18 Aug 2011 editions, respectively:

75 Years Ago
August 14, 1936
The consolidated school building at Carrollton was completely destroyed by fire last Saturday evening. Although the origin of the fire is not known, it is believed to have started from spontaneous combustion in the coal bin which was stored about five tons of coal. Eldin Annear and family and the Possehn family, retuning home from Coon Rapids at 11:30 first discovered the blaze through the window on the northwest corner of the building.
Fire departments from Coon Rapids and Glidden were called immediately and made quick response but the blaze had gained too much headway for anything to be saved. The frame building was a mass of flames and the fire fighters had to turn their attention to extinguish the flames in the dry grass of the school yard.
Ralph and Oscar Lloyd brought Thomas Hessler’s tractor and plow to the stubble field west of the schoolhouse and plowed a wide strip to stop the spread of the flames. Verne Carter and others made attempts to enter the building but the dense smoke made it impossible. Several men remained at the school yard the remainder of the night to watch that no spark would spread the fire. The chimney remained standing until after the fire had died down, but it collapsed about 4 a.m.
The building consisted of two basement rooms, four school rooms and four halls and housed ten grades which required four teachers every year. Harvey Toft is superintendent. Miss Ellen Fouts, who taught there last year will be back, and two new instructors have been employed.
Verne Carter is president of the school board, Donald Anderson is secretary and Frank Squires treasurer. Other board members are Charles Bowman, Thomas Hessler, Ed Davis and Abe Conner.

75 Years Ago
August 21, 1936
Members of the Carrollton school board met here Tuesday evening with the Coon Rapids
school board and accepted the offer of the later to take Carrollton students here without charge until suitable school arrangements can be made at the former county seat where the school building was destroyed by fire on the night of August 8. Carrollton has a school of ten grades and it was decided to send the five higher grades here by bus while quarter for the five lower grades will be provided space at the United Brethren church at Carrollton.
The Carrollton school board plans to hold an election in the four school districts comprising the consolidated district to vote on the question of erecting a new building at Carrollton. With the insurance money from the destroyed building and an additional fund of several thousand dollars on hand the Carrollton board has sufficient funds to erect an excellent building. A government grant is also being discussed. The loss in the recent fire was total including all school records which causes an embarrassing situation in regard to school credit of pupils. The school faculty is not to blame in this matter as the school had no fireproof vault.
The Coon Rapids school is also without a vault for valuable records, a situation which is now having serious consideration.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Civil War Series on Sunday - Enlistment 18 Aug 1861


Civil War Series on Sunday
Enlistment 18 Aug 1861
150 Years Ago This Week


One hundred fifty years ago this week, Joseph Kinnick enlisted to serve in the Civil War.
He was the brother of my great-great grandfather, Walter Watson Kinnick:

Name: Joseph Kinnick
Residence: Wyanet, Illinois
Enlistment Date: 18 Aug 1861
Side Served: Union
State Served: Kansas
Service Record: Enlisted as a Sergeant on 18 August 1861.
Enlisted in Company D, 7th Cavalry Regiment Kansas on 3 Sep 1861.
Promoted to Full Private (Reduced to ranks) on 12 Aug 1862.
Mustered Out Company D, 7th Cavalry Regiment Kansas on 10 Mar 1865 at St Louis, MO.
Sources: 72

Note: He made a practice of leaving his unit to go home 'for a while,' now and then - he was a teamster; they always took him back. He had a couple of children born while he was 'in the service' of his country. His pension record is fascinating reading - as is his life, now that I think about it.  ;-)

    *     *     *     *     *

OK, here is more detail of his story...

On 18 Aug 1861, Joseph enlisted in Company D, Seventh Regiment, Kansas Volunteers, Cavalry. He served in Captain C.S. Merriman's Company of Wyanet. Joseph served as a teamster in the Quartermaster Department [6]. He was promoted to Sergt. 3 Nov 1861 [5]. In January and February, 1862, he was reported absent and deserted. Rolls for June, July, and August, 1862, show him present [6]. Reduced to ranks, 12 Aug 1862. [5] Returned 14 Aug 1862, reinstated by General Granger [6]. A second daughter, Margaret Susana (Maggie), was born to Joseph and Rachel on 5 Jan 1863 [] {strongly suggests where he was in March and April, 1862}.

For July and August, 1863, absent sick at Regimental Hospital. For September and October, 1863, present. For November and December, 1863, absent, but, assigned to the 3rd Michigan Cavalry, S.O. 15 Hdqtrs Cav Div 16th A. C. For September and October, 1864, absent, with leave in Camp. [6] Joseph served until being mustered out at St. Louis, MO, 10 Mar 1865. [5]

Reported in the Rock Island ARGUS, 14 Mar 1865: "a little daughter {Amanda} of Mrs. KINNICK, living about 6 miles above Sheffield in Bureau County {Concord Twp}, died in a fire last Thursday aged about 5y. She was alone in the home at the time with another child, aged 18m. {Margaret Susana}. Mr. Kinnick is a soldier." {names inserted by the compiler}.

From end notes: [1] Joseph said Richland Co on Pension Applications in later years, though that seems unlikely; will continue to check further.

[2] According to family tradition, based on information supplied by the Fletchers, see P.R. # 2. It is likely the Mercers were also on the same boat, or, at least, moved during the same season.

[3]"Laurel's Story, A Montana Heritage," by Elsie P. Johnson, 1979.

[4] Obituary, Elma Mae Moore, Mountain Democrat, May 13, 1987.

[5] Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kansas, 1861-1865, Vol. 1.

[6]Pension file of Joseph Kinnick

... just a little more...  ;-)


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Surname Saturday - CHRISTENSEN


Surname Saturday
CHRISTENSEN


My mother's mother's mother was Jensene Marie NIELSEN, born in Denmark. As I reported in that Dec 2009 post, "This is my 'shortest line.' That has now been modified, as first reported recently in this July 31 Sentimental Sunday post. Following a series of discussions with our new found cousins in Denmark, we now have the names of both the parents of Jensene and of her husband, Lauritz SORENSEN, including maiden names in each case.

Today, we will share the brief information obtained on Jensene's father, Niels CHRISTENSEN (Kudsk).

At this point, a discussion of Scandinavian family name etymology is necessary. Heritable family names (surnames) were generally adopted rather late within Scandinavia. In Denmark, the most common Danish family name surnames are patronymic and end in -sen; in our case NIELSEN. [scroll down on the wikipedia reference to see the most common surnames in Denmark; NIELSEN is #2 and SORENSEN is #8].

So, Jensene Marie NIELSEN, my great-grandmother, had a father named Niels CHRISTENSEN. The 'Kudsk' at the end of his name, sometimes, in the record, means 'coachman' - to help distinguish who was being referenced. [In this case, my cousin shares: 'They took the name because back in 1743 his ancestor worked as a coachman for the Lord at Rodslet Manor, the job went from father to son and so on.]

Niels was born 19 Sep 1817, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark, and died 24 Mar 1867, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark.

He married Maren Kristine MORTENSDATTER. She was born 26 Jan 1823, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark and died 29 Mar 1915, Hvorup parish, Aalborg, Denmark.

They had 7 children (with known information):

1. Christen, b. 19 Dec 1846; d. 10 Nov 1865
2. Morten, b. 9 Sep 1848; d. 3 Dec 1931 - ancestor of my cousin in Denmark
3. Karen, b. 4 Aug 1850; d. unk
4. Jensene Marie, b. 20 Aug 1852; d. 1906 - my g-grandmother
5. Rebekka, b. 3 Apr 1856; d. 2 Dec 18676
6. Caroline, b. 23 Nov 1858; d. unk
7. Else Marie, b. 23 Jan 1864; d. 1924

NOTE: Based on this new information from Denmark, 3 surnames have been added to PAGE TWO of the blog listing my surnames through the 3rd Great-Grandparents.

Families are Forever!  ;-)

Friday, August 19, 2011

Follow Friday - 19 Aug 2011


Follow Friday
19 Aug 2011



When I see the phrase: " …is very, very commonly ignored especially by novices, but often by experienced researchers…" it catches my attention.

James Tanner writing at Genealogy's Star includes this phase in his excellent discussion of The Research Process Steps in "Skipping the evaluation of records."

I believe we can each benefit form this updated presentation making use of the new information at the FamilySearch Research Wiki. Check it out, both the blog post by James and the Wiki references. … whether you are a novice or and experiences researcher…  ;-)


What do you think? Will you use this reminder it? Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, August 13, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 32

Eileen KINNICK Diary - 75 yrs ago
Week 32 - Aug 3-9


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo. Lund family lived down the road, on the way to town.

Week 32. The first three days continue at Spring Lake, on vacation with friends (See Week 31). She does drive the car, regularly, you will note. "Lil's & Del" refer's to her aunt Lillian (father's sister) and husband, Delbert Ford. Carrolton school was a few miles north of town - had been the historic 'first town' in Carroll County. We later lived out that direction - many of the folks out that way were good friends and neighbors. Burning of the school was a 'big deal.'

Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.


Families are forever!  ;-)

Friday, August 12, 2011

Follow Friday - 12 Aug 2011


Follow Friday
12 Aug 2011


I don't have a smart phone and am not likely to get one - but every young person (and many not so young) that I know seems to have one. The technology in this article is worth noting. It has been referenced in several genealogy blogs - you may have seen one.

QR Codes are showing up in more and more places. Check out the 'living headstones' story here.

What do you think? Will you use it? Comments welcomed.


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Saturday, August 6, 2011

Eileen KINNICK - 75 yrs ago - Week 31


Eileen KINNICK Diary - 75 yrs ago
Week 31 - July 27-Aug 2


My mother, Eileen KINNICK (maiden name), kept a diary from 1932 until her death in 1999. In Feb 2005, I created a website of her 1936 diary, the year she graduated from high school, and started dating my dad later in the year. The transcription, week by week, with commentary, notable items, and my comments are sitting there to view, unchanged (a few back links and all!). I am starting this retro view in the middle of the year. You are welcome to click on the Weekly Index, and go back to read the first half of the year, at your leisure.
Key:
My comments - in red
Commentary at the time - in green
Notable items - in blue

Setting: The family lived in a farmhouse a couple of miles out of town (Coon Rapids, Iowa). Older brother, Leo, lived at home; girl friend, later wife, Ida. Younger brother, Buzzy (she often wrote Bussy); see photo. Lund family lived down the road, on the way to town; with two girls near her age.

We start with Week 31, when she goes on a vacation trip with a bunch of friends to a nearby town. Enjoy the read. Comments welcomed.



Families are forever!  ;-)

Featured Blogger at TeachStreet


Featured Blogger at TeachStreet


Nice to be a Featured Blogger at TeachStreet.
Stop by and check it out.

'Learn Something New'

Friday, August 5, 2011

Follow Friday - 5 Aug 2011

Follow Friday
5 Aug 2011

Two suggestions this week: one related to blogging, one related to researching records.

BLOGGING

I've gone through a number of "shift's" and "reviews" in my blogging life. In this post, Bart, as GeneaPopPop, at 'Stardust 'n' Roots' has some excellent suggestions for each of us to consider as we go about this activity called 'blogging' - not bad information for READERS of blogs, as well. What do you think?

"Be-Attitudes for GeneaBlogging (What I Which I Knew When I Began)."


RESEARCHING RECORDS

Here is a fine 'reminder' for each of us, from the freshest 'newbie' in genealogy to the most 'grizzled' veteran. Thank you, again, Michael Hait, for your excellent writing that helps us understand this critical issue even better:

"Five things you have to know about every record."


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - Mom and Son


Wordless (Nearly) Wednesday - 

Mom and Son






Mother and Son each seem to be very happy. Look at those facial expressions.

Appears I'm perhaps 5 or 6, as we were at the carnival, in a photo booth; 1944-45.  


Families are Forever!  ;-)

Monday, August 1, 2011

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Revolutionary Founders


It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
Revolutionary Founders


This is the twenty-second entry for this meme, suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books.


The full title is: 

Revolutionary Founders: Rebels, Radicals, and Reformers in the Making of the Nation
Edited by Alfred F. Young, Gary B. Nash, and Ray Raphael.

Description from Amazon.com:

Product Description
In twenty-two original essays, leading historians reveal the radical impulses at the founding of the American Republic. Here is a fresh new reading of the American Revolution that gives voice and recognition to a generation of radical thinkers and doers whose revolutionary ideals outstripped those of the Founding Fathers.

While the Founding Fathers advocated a break from Britain and espoused ideals of republican government, none proposed significant changes to the fabric of colonial society. As privileged and propertied white males, they did not seek a revolution in the modern sense; instead, they tried to maintain the underlying social structure and political system that enabled men of wealth to rule. They firmly opposed social equality and feared popular democracy as a form of “levelling.”

Yet during this “revolutionary” period some people did believe that “liberty” meant “liberty for all” and that “equality” should be applied to political, economic, and religious spheres. Here are the stories of individuals and groups who exemplified the radical ideals of the American Revolution more in keeping with our own values today. This volume helps us to understand the social conflicts unleashed by the struggle for independence, the Revolution’s achievements, and the unfinished agenda it left for future generations to confront.

About the Author
Alfred F. Young is professor emeritus of history at Northern Illinois University and was a senior research fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago. He lives in Durham, North Carolina.

Gary B. Nash is professor of history emeritus and director of the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA. He lives in Pacific Palisades, California.

Ray Raphael is the author of A People’s History of the American Revolution, Founding Myths, and several other books on the nation’s founding. He lives in northern California.




Happy Reading,

Bill  ;-)